Learning Fingerstyle Guitar

JGaulard

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I just finished up a really great lesson. I've been learning how to play fingerstyle, or fingerpicking, guitar for about a week now and while at first I didn't have much confidence that I'd learn anything at all, I now feel as though I'm actually getting someplace. What I've been working on is a certain simple pattern with the Em and Am chords and then another very similar pattern with the D and A chords. I have to tell you, while I thought the first group of chords sounded good, the second is so much better. Fingerstyle guitar is so elegant and wonderful. It's really what I want to stick with forever, so I think I'll give this an all out effort. Learning how to play the guitar can get quite depressing at times because it's a lonesome thing and it's tough to gauge your progress, but from what I hear, you really need to push through that. Once you begin making actual music, there's no stopping you. After four years of learning, I think I'm about ready to make some music. I really need to take things to the next level because I've stagnated badly.

I'm going to use this thread to track my progress. Perhaps I'll take some video here and there and post it here, just so I can see how far I've come. Right now, I've only been doing this for about a week, so any video I post early on is going to sound pretty bad. I don't care though. Every person who can play guitar proficiently today began somewhere.

A few problems I'm experiencing thus far: I'm way too tense. I can feel my fingers and bicep tighten as I increase the speed of playing and that's not a good thing. Every instructor on the planet says to stay loose while practicing, so I'll have to remember that. Also, my fingertips are killing me. There's so much repetition at this point that my left hand fingers are pretty much glued to the fretboard the entire time. In almost the same positions. I'll get past that though because yesterday was worse than today and the day before was worse than yesterday.

The instructor who is teaching me this skill at Guitar Tricks is Lisa McCormick. She's pretty great at playing and is a wonderful teacher. Patient, kind, and has a nice smile.
 

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The Four Step Pattern​

Just to catch up, let me explain the very first lesson. It was very basic, but Lisa went over how to use three fingers on my right hand to sort of pluck the guitar strings. I used my thumb on the low E string, my middle finger on the high E string, my thumb again on the G string, and then my pointer finger on the B string. I didn't hold down any chords or anything like that. I just lightly plucked E, E, G, B, Down, up, down, up. Here are the notes for that.

guitar-e-e-g-b.jpg

I practiced this over and over again until it was very smooth.
 

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Changing Chords with a 4-Step Pattern​

In this lesson, Lisa explained how to change chords while playing with four strings, sort of like the ones I just described above. While it wasn't imperative to actually use any chords for this lesson, she emphasized which bass string was appropriate for each chord. For example, if I was using an open G chord, I'd use the low E string for the bass note because the G is a six string chord. For Am, I'd use the A string because that's a five string chord. For D, I'd use the D string because that's a four string chord. So Em - E string, Dm - D string, A - A string, C - A string, F - D string, and so on. Whatever string the chord uses as its bass note, you'll need to pluck with your thumb when playing fingerpicking.
 

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2-Chord Practice Drill #1 - Switching Chords: Exercise #1​

This was the first lesson where I was challenged. In this lesson, I had to hold the Em chord with my left hand and pluck the strings with my right hand. The strings I plucked were:

Thumb - Low E
Middle - High E
Thumb - G
Pointer - B

Then I switched chords to the Am and plucked the following strings:

Thumb - A
Middle - High E
Thumb - G
Pointer - B

So it was almost the same string pattern, but it was changed slightly because the chord changed. Here's the sheet music for that exercise.

guitar-em-am.jpg

This is a fairly easy exercise to play at low speeds. It wasn't until the instructor ramped the speed up that I got lost. I did manage to follow her all the way through after a few days of practicing, which was promising. I felt good because I knew I had learned something. What I did was use a digital metronome I found on Google to practice at different speeds. I began at 100bpm and slowly incremented up 10bpm until I reached 150bpm. That's my range. Surprisingly, 100bpm isn't fast at all for fingerpicking. For flatpicking, it seems a lot faster, but you can go pretty fast early on with fingerpicking.
 

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2-Chord Practice Drill #2 - Switching Chords: Exercise #2​

Okay, this is where I currently am. I practiced this exercise twice today in two 15-minute increments. I am finding that breaking up my practice sessions is working out very well. I stay motivated and don't dread a longer half hour practice session. I was beginning to dread those sessions which was taking a toll on my motivation.

Anyway, this is the same exact exercise as the previous one, but for this one, I used the D and A chords. For the D chord, I plucked the following strings in this order with these fingers:


Thumb - D
Middle - High E
Thumb - G
Pointer - B

So all I plucked were the four highest strings. And when I switched over to the A chord, I plucked these strings with these fingers in this order:

Thumb - A
Middle - High E
Thumb - G
Pointer - B

This was just like in the first exercise when I was using the Am chord. There similar chords that use the A string as the bass note.

Here's the sheet music for this exercise.

guitar-d-a.jpg

I will tell you that playing the D chord with this simple pattern is simply beautiful sounding. So lovely. I practiced over and over and had a lot of fun. Tonight I felt like I can actually learn this, so that's what I'll do. I felt success. Yesterday though, when I first began this exercise, I did notice some buzzing that stemmed from the D string when I plucked the G string. You see, I plucked the D string with my thumb first, then the E with my pointer finger, and then the G with my thumb again. The issue was, when I plucked the G string, the D was still vibrating and because I wasn't used to playing with the D chord yet, I kept placing my thumb nail too close to the D string, which would buzz. I fixed that today with a lot of practice and I don't seem to be doing that anymore. It really does just take a whole heck of a lot of practice and repetition.
 
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3-Chord Practice Drill - Switching Chords: Exercise #3​

I have now moved onto the three chord practice drill from the two chord practice drill. I felt I was ready to go because I was doing very well at the previous lesson. Also, I figured that this one is just more of the same, which it is. Although, in this drill, I'm playing the G, C, and D chords as opposed to the D and A. Here, take a look at the lesson music.

guitar-g-c-d.jpg

I'm doing well with this exercise. Of course, since it's the first time playing it, there are some screw ups, but overall, I'm doing better at this one one the first day than I did with the other two on the first day. That's got to say something. Although, I'll tell you that I'm noticing more finger strength is necessary when playing the G and C chords. With all of the other exercises so far, the bass note was left open, so I didn't have to fret that string. With this exercise, I need to fret both the G and the C chords with my left ring finger. Holding those fat strings down to have the note ring out clearly isn't the easiest thing in the world. I'm also noticing that I need to be fast with that finger when switching chords. If I hesitate and don't get it all the way down to the fret in time, the note is either a dead thump or a buzz. So that little element has changed things somewhat. Onward and upward.

I'll most likely be working on this exercise for a few nights. I'm still breaking my practice lessons up into two 15 minute chunks. It's been working out well that way. I've done one already and in about an hour I'll do another. My fingers get pretty sore after one session, so it's nice to give them a break. After this is the first fingerpicking song, which is really just another few chords in succession.
 
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If you already know the basic open chords, leaning very rudimentary fingerpicking isn't too tough. And by rudimentary, I mean, like, first week stuff. The trick with fingerpicking seems to be speed, accuracy, and coordination. I suppose that's true with any type of guitar playing, but with fingerpicking as opposed to, say, strumming rhythm guitar, you need to be extra careful with where your fingers end up. Any false moment can result in plucking the wrong string or even touching the wrong string, which would make a buzzing sound.

I just finished up my first lesson of the day. I missed yesterday because we were out. And because we had to go out, we had to let our wood burning stove die down. I don't keep it going when we're not here. It's been very cold outside, which makes the inside of the house very cold when no heat is on. And I'm not sure about you, but I can't play the guitar when my fingers are cold, no matter how hard I try. It's just not worth the effort.

Today I worked on the same exercise as I worked on last time. Basically it was the four string pattern going through the G, C, and D chords. This is pretty easy, but I'm now working on increasing my speed, my accuracy, and playing along with Lisa in the video lesson.

I usually begin my metronome work at 100bpm, but today I began at 150bpm. I stayed relaxed and that speed wasn't much of a challenge for me. I increased the speed to 175bpm and then 200bpm and remarkably, I was able to play both rather well with little error. After that, I reduced the speed back down to 150bpm and that felt slow. I love doing that because what once felt out of my reach became rather easy to accomplish. By the way, I use the free metronome on Google for my practice. I bought a physical metronome back in 2012, but I hardly use that anymore. There are virtual ones available that are pretty cool.

To wrap up my first 15 minute practice of the day, I played along with Lisa McCormick. I was surprised to discover that I was able to keep up with her the entire time. This is a first for that. She plays very quickly towards the end and I made it all the way through. I did stumble a bit in the middle, but that wasn't because of the speed. It was because she was talking and I got distracted. I need to get used to other players and singers while I'm playing or I'll never be the star on stage I'm planning on being. That was a joke. Okay, until next time, which will be in a few hours.
 

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All the Pretty Little Horses by Lisa McCormick​

Today's lesson was lots of fun. I actually began practicing this simple song last night, but I turned to it in earnest this afternoon. Since I have to go out tonight, I am probably only going to be getting 15 minutes of practice today. Although, if I get back early enough, I may try to sneak in a second practice session. At least I was able to get one in so far. The days when I go out in the evenings are tough. I rarely get to practice at all. I'm trying harder now though. I'm making much more of an effort to get some playing in twice each and every day. Good playing too. Purposeful playing.

Take a look at this song. This is the first fingerpicking song I've played and I think I did okay.

all-the-pretty-little-horses.jpg

This was composed by Lisa McCormick and it's fairly nice to play to. It's actually only three chords, which keeps the playing simple. There is one change when compared to the previous exercises though. Previously, we played two bars for each chord in each exercise and in this one, it's only one bar. That is, until the end of the song when the Em chord repeats.

The addition of this small factor didn't rock my world. I handled it well. I do need to sit and focus more during my next practice though because what I'm finding is that as soon as I "get" something, I want to move onto the next thing. I need to resist that temptation because my fingers aren't ready for more advanced technique. I still tend to screw things up and make weird noises with the strings, so I should spend more time practicing with the metronome.

Also, Lisa sings during this lesson and that screws me all up. I spend so much effort focusing on the sound of my guitar that when something else is going on in the room, I lose all of that focus. I can't be doing that, so I really should learn how to work that out. I guess I'll just keep going. At least it's something to pay attention to.
 

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I went into town today and visited the local music store. I was looking around at Yamaha keyboards when I noticed the shop owner also sold guitar thumb picks. I wasn't aware of that and I hadn't thought about wearing one for my fingerpicking as of yet. I have seen these in the past and tonight, my curiosity got the better of me. I bought a large sized white National pick for $2 and just tried it out on my guitar. I have to tell you, this is either going to be the greatest or worst thing that's ever happened to my playing. At first, I couldn't use it at all and I wanted to throw the thing across the room. It's a big change going from playing fingerstyle with the fleshy part of my thumb to using a pick. The pick requires me to keep my thumb at a bit of a distance from the strings. Once I got use to that, I played fine and after a few minutes, I played almost to speed. I tried things out for approximately 20 minutes and then decided that I should save it for tomorrow. I'm glad I gave it a shot though.

I also read a few opinions about thumb picks vs. no pick in some acoustic guitar forums online. From what I read, it seems that if you can get used to the pick and become proficient at it, then use one. The bass notes ring out much more clearly and the sound can be much more dynamic than using no pick at all. I'll admit that right now, my bass notes are somewhat dull while using just my thumb.

Here's a photo for you. After I played, I looked at picks on Amazon and realized that I got ripped off down at the store this evening. The going rate for a plastic thumb pick online is $.50 or less each. I paid the $2 and thought it was a steal. Guess not. If I decide that I like playing with one, I'll likely buy a 12-pack of picks or something. We'll see.

guitar-thumb-pick.jpg
 

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Well, I played through two practice sessions today with my new thumb pick. My decision on the whole thing is - I don't know. I just don't know. I do like the way it sounds and I know I can get used to it. I'm actually almost used to it completely. I can play just as fast and accurately with the pick than without. The thing is, it really does make the bass notes quite a bit louder than the high notes and one of the reasons I began playing fingerstyle guitar in the first place was because of the beautiful sounding high strings. Another thing about playing with a pick is that I'm not getting that tactile satisfaction I was getting with just my fingers. When I take the pick off my thumb and play again, it's so refreshing. I love the feel of the strings on my naked fingers. So I think I'll continue my training without the pick for now. If there comes a time that I need it, I'll slip it on my thumb. No big deal.

I don't have much to report today because I was so focused on the whole pick thing - trying to get used to it. I played through All the Pretty Little Horses a few times and became fairly proficient with it. My greatest struggle thus far is changing chords. I can do the fingerpicking pretty well, but when it comes time to change those chords while picking, it gets a little hairy. That's just coordination though, so I'll keep working. I definitely don't want to go through these exercises too fast. I've done that before and I've regretted it. So I'll creep along and enjoy the ride.
 

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It's tough to know when to move on from one exercise to another when learning how to play the guitar. Do I need to be perfect? Should I stay on this exercise for a day? A week? A month? How long? I pretty much hang around until I get bored. Right now, we're rotating between some fairly basic chords. We've got Em, Am, A, D, G, and C. I think that's all of them. So every exercise so far has included some combination of them. I'm good at them now and at this point, I'm trying to clean up my accuracy. That's what I was working on tonight. Trying to play a little bit lighter and trying to avoid having my thumbnail tough the vibrating string above it. I can do it, but I get lazy and forget sometimes. That's when I hear the distinctive buzzzz. It's so annoying, but it wakes me up.

I played through the previous exercise a few times tonight and then moved on to the next one. That was a song called Simple Gifts. It's a traditional Shaker hymn that I believe was arranged by Lisa McCormick. I'd include the sheet music in this post, but I don't want Guitar Tricks to yell at me. They don't allow downloading of the songs, so I'll leave it out.

The previous exercise shook things up somewhat in that they had the chords play for only one measure. That sped up the chord changes, which was fun. In this song, the chords are staggered. There are only two of them; G and D, but it goes like this (per measure) G, G, D, D, G, G, D, G, G, G, G, D, G, G, D, G. So instead of G, G, D, D, G, G, and so on, there was neither rhyme nor reason to their arrangement. That's fine. It just took a little getting used to is all. But I played well with very little practice. I'll continue on with this lesson next time too, so I avoid jumping ahead too quickly. I feel guilty every time I do that.

I wanted to mention something funny. When I said above that I was playing at 200bpm, I was actually playing at 100bpm. I completely forgot that I was playing eighth notes. Duh. So tonight, when I was practicing Simple Gifts, I set the metronome to 90bpm and played two beats per click.

Also, I practiced straight through the half hour this evening. I was having fun and focusing pretty well, so I didn't see any need to stop at the 15 minute mark, only to start up later on. That would have been silly.
 

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I don't know if I've been living under a rock or something, but I just noticed that a website called JamPlay exists. Apparently, this site has been trying to take the top spot from GuitarTricks, which has been live since 1998. I actually found JamPlay on YouTube as I was searching around for fingerpicking videos. I'm still trying to see who uses the thumb pick and who doesn't. One of the instructors on JamPlay (Don Ross) uses one and I really like the sound. I also notice that Lisa McCormick on GuitarTricks uses her fingernails, so that's sort of like a pick, or picks. I don't have any nails and I'm really not planning on growing any, so I'm wondering if I should try this thumb pick again. I'm so confused.

Anyway, I may look into JamPlay for instruction. They've got a holiday sale going on right now for $99 per year. I like the way their courses are broken up by instructor too. It's sort of cool. And they've got badges and points, which I really like for motivation. Okay, until next time.
 
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Travis Picking with Don Ross​

After I wrote my post about Don Ross and JamPlay last night, I watched one of his instructional videos on YouTube. I liked what I saw, so I pulled out my Martin Road Series DRS2 guitar and started playing a bit. I wanted to try the pattern he was teaching. After all, beginning fingerpicking is all about patterns. I've been playing the one that Lisa McCormick has been teaching for the past week, so I was itching to try something new. Not that I'm committed to this new one at all. I merely wanted to see if I could do it.

Well, after some practice, I was able to perform the pattern as well as to be expected. I wasn't able to play it at speed or anything, but my accuracy was there. In case you're interested, here it is:

Chord: Em

Thumb - Low E
Pointer - G
Thumb - D
Middle - B

Thumb - A
Pointer - G
Thumb - D
Middle - B

So really, all you're doing is alternating the bass note, which is pretty cool. It's a little confusing in the beginning, but once you play it through a few times, it's okay. It only took me about five times through very slowly to get it.

What's nice about this pattern is that you can switch chords with it too and it sounds great. Just change up the bass notes. Towards the end of the video, Don added another finger to the mix on the High E string, which added some flavor. I'm actually going to go back and practice this pattern tonight so I can give it some more time. I'll do that after I'm finished with my regular practice. This is a bit of a bonus. And by the way, I did play this with my thumbpick because that's what Don was using. I'm glad I bought that.

Check out the video:

 

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Speed Building Exercise #1​

I didn't even get to the Don Ross practice tonight. I spent an entire half hour trying to get used to the thumbpick. By the end of the practice session, I pretty much had it. I mean, I was fairly good at it. And then, right before I put my guitar back in its case, I tried exactly what I was doing with my naked thumb and did about 100 times better. I think I'm going to call it quits with the pick for now. I mean it this time. Unless someone specifically instructs me to use it, I'll practice without. I am so much faster without it and, again, I love how tactile it is. I just wish I could get the strings to ring out more.

Anyway, I moved on from Simple Gifts this evening and began a speed building exercise. Here is the exercise itself:

speed-building-exercise-1.jpg

This was pretty easy. Basically, it calls for the C chord and the Fm7 chord and alternates between the two, plucking the same patter with the right hand. If you aren't familiar with the Fm7 chord, it's almost the same as the C chord. Set up the C chord and then move the ring and middle finger down one string, respectively. And there you go. I thought this was the F chord for a moment, but then I remember that the F chord uses a mini bar with the pointer finger over the B and high E strings. So you'd bar the C and F notes there.

The exercise is like this: you play the notes just as the music asks for; two measures each. Then, after a few runs though, cut it down to one measure for each chord. And then increase the speed somewhat. I only got through it a little, so I'll work on this again tomorrow. This is the second time I've gone for the half hour straight, so we'll see how that goes. I would like to go back to the two 15 minute sessions, but I have been getting myself involved with work, so time is limited. Until next time!
 

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As it ends up, this speed building exercise isn't the easiest things in the world to work through. The first thing I'm having issues with has nothing to do with the exercise at all. It has to do with the fact that I can't seem to get the guitar strings to ring out nicely like I did just a few days ago. I'm thinking that I might need to change my strings. I needed to do this before I began playing fingerstyle, so I think that's catching up with me. Some of them just sound dead and it's so annoying. Instead of focusing on my finger movement and the chords, which is all I'm supposed to be focusing on at this point, I'm battling with the sound. I will get to that tonight.

Also, the way this exercise works is like this: I play two measures of C and then two measures of Fm7. Then I repeat that a few times at approximately 80bpm. Then I switch to only one measure each. Then I go back to two measures, but increase the speed to about 90bpm. And then I switch to only one measure each at that speed. It gets a little hairy towards the end because of fatigue. The last time I tried it, my fingers got tied in a knot. I'm sure that's normal at this point in my learning, but it's totally demotivating. I'll keep practicing with my metronome though and then I'll play along with Lisa. But first, I'll change those strings because that dull thudding is getting on my nerves.
 

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Check out these pictures. What a beautiful instrument. They're of my Martin Road Series DRS2 guitar. I just changed the strings, tuned that bad boy up, and played a bit more. What a difference new strings make. Wow. The sound just rings out so clearly. I will say that I still hate the F note, but whatever. That's neither my nor the guitar's fault. It's just the way it is.

I practiced the speed building exercise again and was slightly better at it. It's still pretty rough at higher speeds, but I'll get there. I was better than I was previously, so that's hopeful. Really, it's partially the chord change from C to Fm7. I'm not great at it. Also, because my pointer finger sits far too long on the C note on the second string, I mix up the chords a bit at times. I'll throw a G and a D in there, just to give that finger a break. There's no need for that type of stress.
 

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I just finished this afternoon's guitar practice. I'm starting to split the 15 minute practice sessions up a bit more. I'd like to space them out some. Typically, I was holding them about an hour apart from one another, but now I think I'd like to hold them at least a few hours apart with six hours being the optimal spacing. I think my brain will absorb the material better and more thoroughly this way.

Anyway, I tried the speed building practice again. I'm still not great at it, but I think I'm better than I was. After I followed Lisa a few times, I went off on my own ad did a sequence of G, C, Fm7, and then D. And then I did that backwards. And forwards and backwards again. For the first few rounds, I'd do two measures of each chord and then after that, I'd switch to just one measure each. I began at 80bpm and then after a few minutes, I raised that to 90bpm. Finally, I raised the metronome speed to 100bpm and played until I screwed up consistently. That's when I know my 15 minutes is up - when I can't hold it together anymore.

I've got such respect for those who can play the guitar beautifully. I was watching a Joe Bonamassa concert at the Royal Albert Hall in London last night and man, that guy can play. I can't even get through a speed building exercise and this dude can play in his sleep. And not only that, he memorizes all the songs he plays. I suppose it doesn't hurt that Joe began playing when he was four years old, but still.


A question I've been asking myself lately is: can I just play fingerstyle guitar? I'm not really interested in playing with a pick. I'm also not interested in acting like I'm playing with a pick, but using my fingers. What I'd like to do is dedicate myself to only plucking strings. I've seen plenty of people do this and those are the ones I love the most. After about four years of attempting to learn how to play the guitar, I'm very much attracted to fingerpicking, so I'd like to dedicate my time there. Anyone have any advice? Do you (or anyone you know) do this? I'll never be a professional guitar player. I know this. I just want to use what limited time I have to learn something that sounds nice to play for people.
 

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Wow, what a great practice. I'm still feeling the high. My speed and accuracy with this speed building exercise is getting so much better. I was just picking at 110 bpm and was doing fairly well. I began at 80 bpm and then went to 90, 100, and finally 110. I began to lose it at the end, so I felt like I may have pushed it too far. But whenever I do that and then go down in speed, I'm so much better at that slower speeds. I'm sure to keep my good habits intact though. I don't want to train myself to be fast and sloppy. I want to be fast and clean, so if it takes a while to get there, then so be it.

I noticed two things recently that help with this exercise. First, if I practice my G, C, Fm7, and D combo and then go to the C and Fm7 combo and practice with Lisa, I'm much better. Adding those extra chords pushes me somehow and then going back to the easy two chords that she's practicing is a snap. I still couldn't hang with her at the fastest speed though, but that may be because she was plucking at around 150 bpm. It'll take a while to get there.

Also, I noticed that if I listen to the notes while I'm picking, I concentrate less on what I'm doing with my fingers and I actually do much better overall. So if I pluck the higher notes a trifle more ambitiously, as to sort of make music, I let my fingers do their thing and I get in less trouble. It's an interesting phenomenon.
 

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I did more of the same last night. I'm still trying to get my fingers to accurately pluck the correct strings. I worked on my G, C, Fm7, and D circuit and then I played the speed exercise along with Lisa. I'm happy to say that I made it through at full speed, but I also made many mistakes. I'm really trying to work on my cleanliness and accurately plucking the correct and only the correct strings. The faster I play, the more prone I am to getting all fumbled up. It's not an easy thing, but I have a feeling that once my fingers get used to this type of playing, I'll be fine and the future will be bright.

I also took my first guitar practice video last night. I learned something from this video - well actually a few things. First, I played okay in some respects, but I made a lot of mistakes. I don't care how it looks because this is my first week. Some people concern themselves with what others will say about them on YouTube, but I look at it like this: you go ahead and pick up a guitar and try learning to play it. If you can do better than I'm doing at this style after a week, more power to you. But really, everyone starts someplace. We are what we are.

The second thing I learned is that when I record the next video, I need to set the camera on the other side of me for a better angle. I'd like to see my chord hand and my picking hand. That's what I've seen most people show online. Here's the video.

 

JGaulard

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Speed Building Exercise #2​

For the past few nights, I've been practicing a new speed building exercise. This one consists of three chords; Am, C, and Em. I was doing pretty well with the previous exercise and I thought I'd breeze right through this one. What I'm finding though is that while my right hand picking is getting better, I'm actually getting worse with the chord changes. I know that it takes a while to get used to things, but I sometimes feel like I'm going backwards. I'm sure this is all part of learning guitar and if I did a Google search right now for something like, "I feel like I'm getting worse at guitar," I'd see thousands of entries. I know I'm not the only one. Oh well, I guess I'll just keep practicing. Practice makes perfect, as they say. I do have the fear, although, that I'll die before I get any good. I wonder if many others have that fear as well.

Here is the exercise I'm working on. Again, Lisa likes to follow the measures as they're shown on the paper to begin with, but then reduces the measures to only one per chord the further we go. And then she ramps up the speed to make it even tougher. I'm sure this is having an effect and if I were to play any of this at 80bpm as opposed to 140, then I'd be better than I ever was. But I'm pushing it, which is screwing me up.

guitar-speed-building-exercise-2.jpg
 
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Learning Fingerstyle Guitar was posted on 12-14-2020 by JGaulard in the Etcetera Forum forum.
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