How to Tie Basic Knots

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  • #21

Flemish Bend​


Bends are very cool knots intended to connect two different ropes. Sometimes bends connect two ropes of the same type, but other times they connect two very different types of ropes. I've got a bunch of bends to show you, so sit tight.

For today's bend, I've got the Flemish. Flemish bend that is. This is a knot that has fallen out of favor with those who have used it to tie natural fiber ropes because when tightened, those people would have difficulty untying it, which is one characteristic that bends enjoy. They're meant to be untied. When it comes to synthetic ropes though, this is a great knot. It ties well, is plainly visible to see if it's been tied correctly, and it just looks good. It's got a cool name too. Plus, it does a great job connecting the two ropes, which is why climbers enjoy this one so much.

To tie this knot, start off with a loop in one end of one of your ropes.

first-loop.jpg

Next, pinch where you crossed the rope to keep it securely in place and then twist the loop over once. In my case, I twisted it counter clockwise because I had originally placed the working end over the standing part.

twisted-loop.jpg

Then, take the working end of the rope and feed it under the loop and then through. You'll see that your knot looks like a figure eight.

figure-eight.jpg

That's pretty easy so far. That's actually half the knot!

To continue on, you basically want to introduce the second rope to the knot and then trace the first knot with the second. Here I am bringing the second rope into the fray.

introduce-second-rope.jpg

After feeding the black rope through the bend in the orange rope, I continued feeding the black rope along the orange rope. Take a look.

loose-flemish-bend.jpg

It's at this point you should neaten up the ropes as best as possible. Notice how I have my knot fairly flat.

To tighten the knot, simply pull the working ends and then the standing parts away from one another. Do this slowly as to not disturb the knot.

flemish-bend-knot.jpg

Above is the classic Flemish bend knot. After tightening it some more, this is what it looks like.

tight-flemish-bend.jpg
 
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  • #22

Common Whipping​


Using a whipping knot is a great way to prolong or avoid having the end of a rope come unwound. I actually just bought a piece of rope to use in this post at Tractor Supply. It's a 3/4" cotton 3-stranded rope and one end of it was completely undone for about six inches. It's a shame too, because it's nice rope. Someone at the store forgot to use electrical tape on it to keep those strands from coming loose. As you may have guessed, electrical tape hasn't been available as long as rope has, so what fishermen, loggers, and anyone else who would want to keep the ends of their ropes nice and neat would do is tie a whipping knot at each end of them. It's a neat little solution that's actually new to me. After trying it out on my new rope though, I can definitely see the value.

For clarity purposes, I'm using paracord as my whipping rope, but in real life, you'd want to use something thinner. Something that really grabs on to itself, not that paracord doesn't do that. After I was finished tying this knot, I had a tough time getting it loose and I didn't even tie it too tightly.

Also, I didn't cut the end of the larger rope after I was finished to make the whipping rope sit at the end. I'm going to be using this white cotton rope in future posts, so I wanted to keep it intact.

Okay, to tie this knot, create a bend in your thin rope or string at the end of your fatter rope. Hold that thinner rope in place with the tip of your finger.

bend-paracord.jpg

Next, take the working end of your thin rope and feed it underneath and around the larger rope.

wrap-whipping-rope.jpg

Continue wrapping the thinner rope around the fatter one until you only have a few inches of thin rope left. Also, be sure to wrap neatly and snugly. The tightness of the thinner rope will be what holds it in place at the end.

multiple-wraps.jpg

When you're done wrapping, feed the working end through the bight.

feed-end-through-loop.jpg

At this point, begin to pull the standing end of the thinner rope so it pulls the bight up against the wraps.

pull-bight-tight.jpg

Continue pulling so that bight drags the working end underneath the wraps. Pull until it reaches about half way through the wraps.

common-whipping-knot.jpg

When finished, trim the ends of the thinner rope carefully. You'll find that this knot is very secure. I didn't trim the ends because I'll need both of these ropes again.
 
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  • #23

West Country Whipping​


Simply put, this knot consists of a bunch of overhand knots and a square knot at the end. It's that easy. Basically, all you're doing is tying an overhand knot around a rope, flipping that rope over, tying another overhand knot, flipping the rope over, and repeating that process until you've worked your way as far as you want to go. At the end, tie a nice tight square knot (reef) and tuck that under the whipping.

Here are a few photos. To start, tie your first overhand knot around the end of your rope. I'd say about two inches away from the end is good.

overhand-around-rope.jpg

Pull the ends of your rope nice and tight so the first knot is secure. Then, flip the large (in this case, white) rope over and tie the same exact knot as before.

flip-rope-overhand.jpg

Again, make this one nice and tight too. To repeat this process, keep flipping the rope over like a pancake and tie a knot each time. After a few of these, your rope should look something like this.

multiple-overhand-knots.jpg

tightened-final-knot.jpg

When you're all finished, tie a square knot as the final one. Tighten it firmly.

tying-square-knot.jpg

Once it's very tight, you can tuck that square knot under the whipping to keep it secure. I suppose if you're working with paracord like this, you can trim the ends first and then melt them with a lighter. I do that all the time. After that you can tuck the square knot under.

Here's a view of the nice side of this knot.

west-country-whipping-knot.jpg
 
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  • #24

Double Figure-of-Eight Bend​


If you compare the fisherman's knot and this one, you'll see they serve the same purpose. They connect two ropes together securely. The difference between that one and this one though is that this one is symmetrical. If you look at the second photo below, you'll see that both knots are identical and are identically positioned. Otherwise, the two knots are very similar.

To tie this knot, tie yourself a figure eight with the end of one rope, just as you did with the Flemish bend. In my case, I began with the orange rope. Once that was finished, I fed the working end of the black rope through the bend in the orange rope and then proceeded to tie the same figure eight with the black rope. Take a look.

two-figure-eights.jpg

Next, pull the ends of each rope to tighten the knots. Then, pull the standing ends of each rope away from one another so the knots touch one another. And there you have your knot.

double-figure-of-eight-bend.jpg
 
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  • #25

Zeppelin Bend​


What a cool knot. This is big in the arborist industry because it connects the ends of two ropes well and it can withstand heavy loads, but unlike other knots of its kind, it's relatively simple to untie. Essentially, this is just two overhand knots tied together. Once you tie this knot one time, you'll remember it forever. It's extremely easy to tie. There's no reason you shouldn't use this knot to tie two ropes together, unless you have something against the two working ends sticking out of the sides. Sure, it may not be the best looking out there, but this is a good one.

To tie the zeppelin bend knot, start off with making a loop at the end of each line. Notice how I tie this in the photo below. Both working ends go on top of the standing parts.

two-loops.jpg

Next, flip one of the loops over and place it on top of or under the other loop. In my case, I flipped the orange rope over and put it under the black rope. Notice how the working end of the black rope is on top of the loops and the working end of the orange rope is underneath the loops. These placements are very important.

flipped-loop.jpg

This next step is the most important. Take the working end of one rope and pass it under or over itself and through the other rope's loop. In my case, I took the working end of the black rope and passed it under itself and through the orange loop rope. Then, I took the working end of the orange rope and passed it over itself and through the black rope loop. Notice how I've tie two overhand knots.

overhand-knots-zeppelin-bend.jpg

To tighten the knot, simply pull the ends of each rope away from each other. This next photo is of a semi-tight zeppelin bend.

loose-zeppelin-bend-knot.jpg

If you keep pulling and dressing the knot, you'll have a nice tight zeppelin bend. Here are two final photos. One regular and one up close.

zeppelin-bend-knot.jpg

zeppelin-bend-knot-close-up.jpg
 
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  • #26

Adjustable Bend​


This is another knot that connects two ropes, but it's somewhat different than the others I've already shown you. If you tie this knot, but keep each one apart from the other, they'll act as sort of a cushion. While under light load, the knots will stay separated, but if the load suddenly becomes heavier, the knots will slide toward one another, reducing the strain of the rest of the rope.

It's sort of confusing to tie this knot for the first time, but it gets easier with every subsequent effort. The confusion stems from tying the second rope, but I'll make that easier when I explain it below. Here goes.

Start by lying the ends of both ropes in parallel with one another, but end to end. Give yourself about a foot and a half of overlap with each rope. Then, bend one of the ropes and feed it over and then under the other rope. After that, feed it under the other rope two more times. And finally, feed it under itself. Take a look.

bend-wraps.jpg

Next, take that working end and feed it over itself and through the last wrap you made earlier.

loop-through.jpg

There's your first knot. All you need to do is dress it. Pull the ends (in this case, the orange rope) tight and fix it so it looks pretty.

This is where things get slightly confusing. To continue on, pick your ropes up and flip them over, end to end. So, in my case, I flipped my orange rope so it changed from coming in from the right side to coming in from the left side and then I did the same with the black rope. That one originally came in from the left side, so I flipped it so it came in from the right side.

After that, all you need to do is tie the identical knot as you just did, but with the other rope. Here is the beginning of my effort.

flipped-ropes.jpg

second-rope-knot.jpg

After I had the second knot tied, I tightened it and dressed it nicely. And that was it.

adjustable-bend-knot.jpg
 
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  • #27

Hunter's Bend​


They say this knot is related to the zeppelin. I'll admit that it does sort of look like it. Both knots hold together very well and they connect two ropes with great strength. I think this one's a bit more difficult to tie though. You be the judge.

To tie this knot, take two ropes and lie them down, end to end, opposing one another.

parallel-ropes.jpg

Then, make a loop like I did below, making sure to keep both ropes parallel.

parallel-loop.jpg

After that, take the working end of the left (orange) rope and feed it underneath both ropes and through the loop. Continue on out of the loop after that.

feed-one-working-end.jpg

Then, feed the other rope's (black) working end through the loop, but this time take it above the loop first and then under and out.

both-working-ends-through-loop.jpg

To finish up, very carefully take both ends of each rope and pull away from one another. You'll need to switch between ropes as you do this to keep things neat.

hunters-bend.jpg

And there you have the Hunter's Bend!
 
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  • #28

Surgeon's Knot​


Here's another great knot that binds two ropes together. It's good with synthetic rope, or any type of rope for that matter. Once tied, it does take some pulling on the standing parts to fully tighten the knot, but that's not a problem if you've got the room.

To tie this knot, the the ends of both ropes and give them two wraps around one another.

two-wraps.jpg

Next, take the working ends and tie an overhand knot, but be sure to follow the example in the photo below. You need each working end to feed over or under in a specific way.

loose-surgeons-knot.jpg

Finally, pull the standing parts of the rope away from one another. The knot should tighten well. You'll find that this one is quite strong. The more you pull it, the more this becomes apparent.

surgeons-knot.jpg

surgeons-knot-close-up.jpg
 
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  • #29

Harness Bend​


This is a great knot that binds two ropes together. It's perfect for not only rope, but for leather straps, nylon tie down straps, and light wire. This is a knot you might want o consider when tying down a load in the back of a pickup truck or trailer. It's got many uses.

To tie this knot, lay down two ropes in parallel fashion, overlapping end to end. Then, take the working end of one rope and feed it under the working end of the other rope and then back over the top of the other rope.

first-bend.jpg

After that, take the same rope (orange) and feed it under itself and then over the working end of the other rope (black) again.

feed-over-under.jpg

Next, take the working end of the other rope (black) and feed it under the standing part of the first rope (orange).

other-rope-under.jpg

And then feed it up and over the first rope and through the loop that it creates.

feed-through-loop.jpg

And that's it! Pull gently on the working ends and the standing parts of both ropes to tighten and you've got yourself a Harness Bend.

Here are two photos, one of the top of this knot and one of the bottom.

harness-bend-bottom.jpg

harness-bend-top.jpg
 
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  • #30

Double Harness Bend with Parallel Ends​


This is another bend that (by definition) ties two ropes together. This is somewhat of a symmetrical knot as it's being tied, but after it's been tightened, it has a tendency to lose its symmetrical-ness. Either way, it holds the two ropes rather well. Let's get tying it.

To tie this knot, I placed both the orange and black rope down, with the black rope overlapping the orange.

orange-black-rope.jpg

After that, I took the working end of the orange rope and up and over the black rope, under itself, and then over the working end of the black rope.

orange-rope-loop.jpg

They say you should take both rope and flip them over, end to end, and then continue tying the knot. I think it's much more practical to simply follow what I did below. Basically, I tied the identical knot with the black rope, but opposite. I took the working end of the black rope and fed it over and then under the standing part of the orange rope and then under itself and then over the orange. I know it sounds confusing, but if you look at the photo, it'll make sense. It's actually pretty easy.

loose-double-harness-bend.jpg

To tighten the knot, I simply pulled on both working ends and standing ends. Once snug, I pulled tighter to set the knot. And that's all it took to tie this one!

double-harness-bend-bottom.jpg

double-harness-bend-top.jpg
 
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  • #31

Strop Bend​


This is a fun knot that I've been trying since I was a kid. There's no right or wrong way to tie this one. If it gets done, it gets done. Just know that it's as secure as the strength of the rope that's used. If the rope breaks, obviously the knot will come loose and the two ropes will separate, but if the rope is strong, then there's no way it's going to come undone. This is a great knot to use when combining two ropes that have been tied to form loops.

To tie this knot, first overlap the two bends of two ropes.

two-rope-bends.jpg

Next, take the working bend and flip it up and over itself.

flipped-loop.jpg

Then, take the standing part and feed it through the working bend.

feed-standing-part.jpg

I know the above two photos look alike, but if you inspect them carefully, you'll see that in the first photo, the working bend is above the standing part and in the second photo, it's beneath it.

Finally, pull the standing part until the working bend is tight. Then dress the knot so it looks like the one below. And that's it!

strop-bend.jpg
 
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  • #32

Carrick Bend (Ends Opposed)​


This is another great knot that holds two ropes together. I actually really like this one. It's good looking when tied and does an excellent job of keeping the ropes together. This is a popular knot that they say is displayed in Ireland. Wherever it came from, I like it.

I was going to give step by step instructions for this one, but since it's so easy to put together, I decided to include only two photos. Take a look at this first one. Basically, all I did was make a bend with the orange rope and then a fed the black rope over the orange rope's bend, under its standing part, over its working end, under one side of the bend, over itself, and then under the other side of the orange bend. To tie this one, simply follow the pattern below.

loose-carrick-bend.jpg

And when that's completed, pull all of the ends and dress the knot so it looks like this.

carrick-bend.jpg
 
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  • #33

Carrick Bend (Ends Adjacent)​


This is the same knot as above, but with the ends on the same side as opposed to the opposite sides. All else applies. To tie this knot, I first made a bend with the orange rope and then fed the black rope underneath both sides of it.

first-bend.jpg

Next, I continued to feed the working end of the black rope over the working end of the orange rope and underneath the standing part of the orange rope.

feed-working-ends.jpg

After that, I kept feeding the working end of the black rope through the orange rope. I went up and over the top part of the bend in the orange rope, under the standing part of the black rope and then back up and over the bottom part of the orange rope.

loose-carrick-bend.jpg

To tighten the knot, I pulled both the standing parts as well as the working ends. I made sure to keep the rope looking neat.

tight-carrick-bend.jpg

And finally, to set the knot, I pulled harder on the standing ends of both ropes.

set-carrick-bend.jpg
 
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  • #34

Vice Versa​


What an awesome knot. I really like this one. Upon first glance, I thought I'd have some trouble tying it, but it was no trouble at all. It was actually very easy and quite satisfying. What I like most about this one is the strength of it and the way it sits so neatly. I hear that you can tie two pieces of wet material such as leather with this knot and they won't slide away from one another. Take a look at the finished product and I think you'll see why. Lots of bends and turns in there.

To tie this knot, I first placed two ends of two ropes opposite one another. Then, I took the working end of the black rope and fed it under the orange rope. Then I continued to feed the black rope over the orange and then under itself, creating a bend.

working-end-over-under.jpg

Next, I took the working end of the orange rope and fed it over the black rope and then under it.

orange-over-under.jpg

To make both ropes symmetrical, I continued to feed the orange rope up and over itself and the black rope and then I went under the working end of the black rope.

both-ropes-symmetrical.jpg

To finish this knot up, I took the working end of the black rope and fed it under and through the orange bend. Then, I took the working end of the orange rope again fed it through the bend in the black rope.

loose-vice-versa.jpg

To tighten the bend, I simply pulled the standing parts of both ropes. I dressed the knot and that was it. Beautiful.

vice-versa-bend.jpg
 
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  • #35

Single & Double Sheet Bend​


They say this knot isn't meant to be used under loads because it's unreliable. I have to trust this, since I've never actually used it. I did, however, tie it and it seemed to be okay. I guess the problem lies with the fact that the larger rope doesn't actually have a knot tied in it. It's merely folded over, which can cause it to roll out. That seems to be an issue. So take this knot with a grain of salt and don't use it for anything that matters.

To tie this knot, I made a bight in the end of my larger braided cotton rope and then fed the working end of my orange rope under the bight.

larger-rope-bight.jpg

Next, I took the working end of my orange rope and fed it up and around the bight of the larger rope. Then, I fed it under itself.

wrap-around-bight.jpg

To tighten this knot, I simply pulled on the standing part of the orange rope.

sheet-bend.jpg

Now, if I wanted to make this bend slightly stronger and able to handle more weight, I'd add another wrap to it before I pulled it tight, like in the photo below.

double-sheet-bend-knot.jpg
 
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  • #36

One-Way Sheet Bend​


Have you ever wanted to pull another rope, wire, or something else through a pipe? Or perhaps tie a strap down on the back of a pickup truck? Have you ever wondered how to tie the knot that would accomplish something like this? Well, this is the one. It's a simple knot (or bend) and it's very similar to the two sheet bends directly above. Check it out.

To tie this knot, I made a bight in the white rope (the rope that needs to be pulled through or tied down) and then fed the working end of the orange rope under and around the white.

bend-rope-around.jpg

Next, I took the working end of the orange rope and fed it under itself.

feed-under-itself.jpg

And finally, I took the working end of the orange rope and wrapped it around itself and then through its own loop. To tighten, I pulled both ends of the orange rope.

one-way-sheet-bend.jpg
 
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  • #37

Heaving Line Bend​


This isn't a bend that's meant to hold a lot of weight. If you're an arborist, you might want to use this knot when attaching your climbing line to your throw ball line. This would be perfect for that. Otherwise, use this with caution as the bend may come apart on you.

To tie this knot, I made a bight in my larger white rope. Then, I placed the working end of my orange rope over that bight.

orange-rope-over-bight.jpg

Next, I fed the working end of my orange rope over and then around and under the standing part of the white rope. I continued to feed the working end of the orange rope over itself.

working-end-under-over.jpg

After that, I fed the working end of the orange rope under the working end of the white rope.

working-end-under.jpg

And finally, I brought the working end of the orange rope up and around the working end of the white rope and then through the loop I created earlier in the orange rope.

heaving-line-bend.jpg

To tighten this bend, I simply pulled on both ends of the orange rope and dressed the knot. Here's another view of this bend when it's tightened and flipped over.

heaving-line-bend-knot.jpg
 
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  • #38

Racking Bend​


This bend is intended to hold different sized ropes together. It doesn't matter what sized ropes they are, as long as one is large and one is small. The goal is to keep the bight of the larger rope intact. In the example below, I use some paracord as the smaller rope and some larger cotton braided rope as the larger. You'll see this type of knot holding large ship ropes together as well as small twines.

To tie this knot, I first made a bight in the white rope. Then, I fed the black paracord over the bight and then under the working end of the rope. It's not important to feed the smaller rope over the working end, per se; it's just the way I did it.

paracord-over-bight.jpg

At this point, I'll begin racking, which is simply what they call weaving in a figure eight style. I'll go under one side of the rope and then up and around and then under the other side. I'll repeat that a few times.

begin-weaving.jpg

racking-weaving-rope.jpg

To finish the weaving, I'll tuck the working end of the smaller black paracord under one of the turns around the white rope.

finishing-weave.jpg

To finish the bend, I'll tighten the paracord from the end toward the bend in the white rope. Then I'll pull the standing part of the black rope tight.

racking-bend.jpg

I suppose if you really wanted to make this knot strong, you can tie a stopper right after the tuck of the paracord. That will keep that part of the rope from sliding. I really don't think that'll happen though because this knot is tight as it is.
 
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  • #39

Seizing Bend​


This is a great knot for connecting two ropes. It seems to be very strong and it looks good to boot. Again, like those above, this bend is meant to be used with one thicker rope and one thinner one, but I'm not sure that two ropes of the same size won't work. Also, to really finish the strength off with this bend, make a knot at the end of the thicker rope to hold everything in place. I don't think you'd need that, but it can only help.

To tie this knot, I made a bight in the thicker white cotton rope and fed the thinner orange rope under it.

bight-rope-under.jpg

After that, I made a turn around the bend in the bight with the orange rope.

loop-around-bight.jpg

Also, just so you're aware, you'll need to extend and adjust the length of rope as you go with this one. I had to keep giving myself slack with the orange rope.

Next up, I took the working end of the orange rope and began my first wrap around the white rope.

first-wrap.jpg

As I wrapped, I made sure that the working end of the orange rope turned over itself to hold itself down.

turn-over-itself.jpg

I then continued on with multiple wraps, ending up on top.

multiple-wraps.jpg

At this point, I pulled more of the orange rope standing part through the bight. I fed the loop I created into the crevice of the white rope.

standing-part-slack.jpg

Then I pulled the standing part of the orange rope tight and slid the orange rope wraps down towards the bend in the white rope. The knot was finished.

tighten-standing-part.jpg

This is a more close up view of the top of the knot.

seizing-bend-top.jpg

And this is the bottom of the bend.

seizing-bend.jpg
 
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  • #40

Albright (Allbright) Special​


I wasn't sure if I was going to like this knot, but after tying it, I fell in love with it. The reason I didn't think I'd like it was because it appeared that it was going to come undone by itself. After giving a first wrap, the wraps continue. The way the outer rope is set up, it looks like that first wrap would simply pull through. What actually happens is that the first wrap becomes much tighter and doesn't pull through in the least. This is a fantastic knot that can be trusted to hold two ropes together. This one is typically used with much thinner ropes, but for demonstration, I used big ones that are easily visible.

To tie this bend, I first made a bight in the thicker white rope. Then, I placed the thinner black rope over the bight, gave the white rope a wrap, and made sure that the working end of the black rope crossed over itself.

For demonstration purposes, I kept the black rope short in the following photo. In reality, it needs to be much longer to make all the required wraps around the white rope.



over-bight-wrap.jpg

After that, I continued with about six or seven wraps around the white rope with the black rope.

multiple-wraps.jpg

I left enough of a tail on the black rope for this next step.

I tucked the tail of the black rope over itself and through the bend in the white rope.

tucked-tail.jpg

tail-through-bend.jpg

Next, I carefully slid all the wraps of the black rope down as close as I could to the bend in the white rope. After that, I pulled on the standing part of the black rope and watched in awe as the entire knot tightened itself. The bend was complete.

albright-special.jpg

allbright-special.jpg
 
How to Tie Basic Knots was posted on 12-28-2020 by CraigHardy in the Outdoor Forum forum.
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