How to Tie Basic Knots

  • Thread starter CraigHardy
  • Start date
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #41

Simple Simon Over​


Now here's a knot I may actually remember how to tie in my lifetime. I've covered so many knots here, but I don't think I'd remember how to tie any of them if put on the spot. I think I can remember this one. It's easy and very strong. They say it's great for tying slick synthetic ropes. I guess that's because it's easy to tie and because it holds very well.

To tie this knot, I made a bight with the black rope and then took the working end of the orange rope and fed it into the black rope's bend, under the standing part and up and over the working end. Then, I fed it under the entire thing.

working-end-under-over-under.jpg

Then, I crossed the working end of the orange rope over itself.

crossed-over.jpg

With the working end of the orange rope, I continued around and under the black rope and through its loop.

under-through-loop.jpg

To tighten this knot, I pulled the orange rope down into place and then dressed the knot.

simple-simon-over.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #42

Simple Simon Under​


This knot is almost exactly the same as the one above. The only difference is that when crossing, you don't go over, you go under. Allegedly, this is a stronger version of the above knot in that the extra friction caused by the rope above the crossing holds in things in place more. Give this one a try, especially if you're planning on using wet of slick rope of different thickness.

To tie this knot, I again made a bight with the black rope and fed the orange rope through the loop, under the standing part, and around both parts of the black rope.

bight-under-over.jpg

Then, after I gave the black rope a wrap with the orange rope, I crossed under, not over itself.

crossing-under.jpg

Next, I continued feeding the orange rope around the black rope and through its loop. Below is the finished knot, just a bit loose.

loose-simple-simon-under.jpg

To tighten the knot (or bend), I pulled both ends of the orange rope and dressed the knot so it sat tightly.

simple-simon-under-knot.jpg

If you really wanted to make this knot permanent and impossible to slip, you could tie an overhand knot in both working ends of the ropes.
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #43

Simple Simon Double​


All of these Simple Simon knots were invented (or should we say popularized) by Harry Asher. In this version, you can use even stranger ropes. By doubling up on the turns and wraps, this bend can carry much more weight than its predecessors.

To tie this knot, I set the ropes up like I did above. I fed the working end, from above, into the bight I created with the black rope. Then I proceeded with two wraps around the black rope with the orange rope.

under-two-wraps.jpg

Then, with the working end of the orange rope, I continued wrapping around the black ropes and crossed the orange over the orange, underneath.

wrap-around-under.jpg

After that, I continued my way around the black rope with the orange, until the final wrap was fed under the working end of the black rope and through the bight again. This is the completed knot, in loose formation.

loose-simple-simon-double.jpg

To tighten this bend, I held both ends of orange rope and pulled away from the black, all the while nudging the loop end of the orange rope towards the loop end of the black. These next two photos show a tightened Simple Simon Double bend, top and bottom.

simple-simon-double-knot-top.jpg

simple-simon-double-knot-bottom.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #44

Shake Hands​


This is a great knot. It's essentially two overhand knots tied together. This is a strong bend that keeps two ropes together well. On top of that, it's relatively easy to untie. Once you learn this bend, you'll have a great and very sturdy knot in your arsenal.

To tie this knot, I first made two loops; one with each rope. In the below photo, notice the working end of each rope. The black end goes under itself while the orange end goes above.

two-loops.jpg

To continue on, I took the working end of the orange rope and fed it through its own loop as well as the black's.

overhand-orange.jpg

Then, I took the working end of the black rope and fed it through its own loop and through the orange's. Notice where both working ends end up. The orange rope goes through the loops and ends up on top and the same for the black, but down beneath.

overhand-black.jpg

To tighten this bend, I alternated the pulling of each rope. First I pulled both ends of the black rope a bit and then I did the same for the orange. By going back and forth between the two, I kept the knots clean and intact. This is the final Shake Hands knot.

shake-hands-knot.jpg

And here it is up close.

shake-hands-bend.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #45

Tumbling Thief Knot, Center Tucked​


This is an interesting knot that will definitely not come undone. It's sort of complicated, so be sure to look at each photo I post below carefully. It matters where the working ends of each rope go. Take this one slowly and you'll find yourself holding a big beautiful knot at the end of your effort.

To tie this knot, I first made a bight with the orange rope. Then, I fed the working end of the black rope under and into the orange rope's bend. Then, I fed the same end out of the bend and under it. Finally, I went back into the bend and under it to exit. It sounds more complicated than it was. Just set your rope up like the photo below.

two-bights.jpg

There are a few steps in this knot where all that needs to be done is to rearrange the rope. This is one of those steps. As you can see, I didn't really change anything below. I merely moved the ropes somewhat. I took the working end of the black rope and slid it under its standing end. Then, I took the working end of the orange rope and slid it over its standing end.

crossover-working-ends.jpg

Next, I merely moved the ropes off of one another, so they are separate. I just pushed the orange rope in its configuration to the left and the black rope to the right. Be careful to keep the ropes looking just like they do in the photo below.

moved-ropes.jpg

For this next step, I pulled the ropes back together, but in a different configuration. Sure, this looks like two steps ago, but it's different.

back-together-intertwined.jpg

Now this is not really a complicated step, but it sure looks like that in the photo below. I'll try to explain what to do here as best I can. If you look at the above photo, you'll see a common space that's dead center of both ropes. It's almost like a square at the center. If I arranged the ropes a little better, I could probably make it a square. Anyway, all that needs to be done is two things. First, I took the working end of the black rope and fed it around itself and through the hole in the center. That's it for that one. Then, I took the working end of the orange rope and fed it under itself and up through the hole in the center. Take a look at the image below.

working-ends-through-common-space.jpg

And that's it! To finish this bend, I pulled on each end of the ropes one by one until the entire knot was tight. Take a look at the top and bottom of this one.

tumbling-thief-knot-bottom.jpg

tumbling-thief-knot-top.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #46

Alpine Butterfly Bend​


This bend is a version of the Alpine Butterfly Knot. It's actually quite simple to tie and is very effective.

To tie this knot, I first created two loops, one with each rope. If you notice, I placed the working ends of both ropes under their standing parts. The ropes are also intertwined with one another.

two-loops.jpg

Next, I brought both working ends up and over themselves and through the common hole at their centers.

working-ends-tucked.jpg

And that's pretty much it. From there, I gently pulled the ends of the ropes until the knot was snug. Here's the final Alpine Butterfly bend.

alpine-butterfly-bend.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #47

Bowline Bend​


The bowline is an incredible knot. It doesn't slip when wet or when ropes of different thicknesses are used. I've always wanted to learn how to tie the bowline and now I know. What a simple and effective knot it is. And when used as a bend, you can be assured that your two ropes will remain connected, even under great strain. Arborists use the bowline all the time when cutting down trees.

To tie this knot, I first tied a bowline in one rope. I began with the black one. To tie the bowline, I made a loop in the black rope and then fed the working end under and through the loop. It's important to follow these instructions carefully. The over and under parts of the rope are critical.

through-loop-bowline.jpg

Next, I fed the working end of the rope under the standing part.

under-standing-part.jpg

And finally, I brought the working end up, over, and through the loop. In the photo below is the loose version of a completed bowline knot.

loose-bowline-knot.jpg

To tighten this knot, I pulled on the working end and the standing part, until everything was snug.

bowline-knot.jpg

To tie the bend, I simply made another bowline with the other rope. I first made my loop with the orange rope and then fed the working end through the black rope bowline.

second-loop.jpg

Again, I fed the working end through the loop and under the standing end.

second-under-standing-part.jpg

Here is the finished bowline bend. It's a beautiful thing.

bowline-bend.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #48

Twin Bowline Bend​


This is an alternative bend to the one shown above. With that one, the ropes are weakened by their sharp angles. With this one below, those angles are absent. Also, this is a very strong bend. It'll surely hold some tension. And on top of that, it's really fun to tie. This is the type of bend that you look at and wonder if you can actually do it. I'm here to tell you that you can. It's very easy. Just follow the simple instructions below.

To tie this knot, I laid down the two working ends in parallel.

parallel-ends.jpg

Then, I made a loop with the black rope and fed the working end of the orange rope through the loop, from the bottom. When following these instructions, be sure to closely follow where the ropes lie on top of one another. It's important to the final knot.

working-end-through-loop.jpg

Next, I fed the working end of the orange rope under the standing part of the black rope.

under-standing-part.jpg

Finally, I fed the working end of the orange rope up and through the black rope's loop. As you can see, this is a regular bowline knot, but with two ropes.

loose-two-rope-bowline.jpg

This is the final tightened two rope bowline. Up next, the other half.

two-rope-bowline.jpg

To tie the second half of this bend, turn the entire arrangement around 180°, so it's opposite of what you just had. This makes it easier to tie. Then, begin tying the exact same thing as you just did earlier.

second-half-through-loop.jpg

And then finish the knot. Here it is, all said and done. So easy!

twin-bowline-bend.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #49

Pedigree Cow Hitch​


I have now moved onto the hitch section of my book. Apparently, hitches are knots that are used to tie ropes to objects, such as posts or links of some sort. Think of tying a horse to a post on main street in the old days. For today's knot, I preset the Pedigree Cow Hitch. This is a sturdy hitch that's good for ropes that approach their post at right angles. You'll see what I'm talking about below. This hitch is strong and would take a lot to pull out. If you wanted to make it ultra secure, you could always tie an Overhand Knot at the very end of the rope.

To tie this knot, I first draped my rope over the post, from front to back.

rope-over-post.jpg

Then, I placed the working end over the standing part.

working-end-over-itself.jpg

Next, I fed the working end of the rope back under the post and then over the front again.

wrap-over-under.jpg

And then through the bight.

working-end-through-bight.jpg

To finish the hitch, I took the working end of the rope and fed it behind both wraps. This way, if tension is placed on the rope, it'll tighten around itself.

pedigree-cow-hitch.jpg

What I was referring to above was an Overhand Knot at the very end of this rope. If that was done, it would have no way of pulling out.

Here's a different view of this hitch.

pedigree-cow-hitch-knot.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #50

Cow Hitch Variant​


They say this variant of the above Pedigree Cow Hitch is stronger than that. I can't tell you one way or another. I can tell you that it's a bit less intuitive to tie. The previous hitch made sense, while this one is slightly cumbersome. I'm sure once you get used to it, it'll be fine. Either way, it's a good hitch.

To tie this knot, I first fed the working end of the rope over the post.

fed-rope-over.jpg

Next, I tied a half hitch.

half-hitch-over-post.jpg

Then, I continued bringing the working end of the rope over the standing part and then I fed it under the post, up and around back to the front and fed it through the wrap. This is the final knot.

cow-hitch-variant.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #51

Figure-of-Eight Hitch​


This is a somewhat useless hitch, as I'm not sure it'll hold anything of consequence. It is easy to tie though and if the end of the rope is tied of with an Overhand knot, I don't think it'll come undone. With so many other great looking and performing hitches out there, I probably wouldn't use this one. However, I'll show it to you anyway.

To tie this knot, I first draped the working end of the rope over the post.

rope-over-post.jpg

Then, I brought the working end over the standing part, around it, and under it.

working-end-over-under-standing-part.jpg

And finally, I fed the working end through the loop in the rope. This last part gives the rope some additional friction if it decides to try to pull out. As I said above, if you tie this rope off at the end, it won't come undone.

working-end-through-loop.jpg

figure-of-eight-hitch.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #52

Buntline Hitch​


This is a fun knot to tie. I like it because it's secure, even under vibration and wind. The tail that stems from the finished knot can wave around all it wants, but the knot still won't come untied. Also, if you look at the mechanics of this hitch, it's actually just two creatively tied half hitches. That's really all there is to it. Strong, secure, and fun to tie.

To tie this knot, I first fed the rope through and over the carabiner.

rope-over-carabiner.jpg

Then, I brought the working end of the rope over and around itself.

rope-figure-eight.jpg

And finally, I continued bringing the working end of the rope around itself again, but this time, at the very end, I fed it through its loop.

second-half-hitch.jpg

To tighten the knot, I simply pulled on both ends of the rope.

buntline-hitch.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #53

Clove Hitch, Tied in a Bight​


The Clove Hitch isn't a great knot. I've heard some guys say they like it, but I also know a lot of guys who won't use it at all. The reason they don't like it is because it's got a tendency to roll out, especially when used to lower limbs during a tree take-down. This knot, however, is a good one when used in conjunction with others. So if you were to use this knot, you could finish it with two Half Hitches or a Bowline. That would stop the rolling out effect. Personally, I like the Bowline because it adds equal loads to the rope. It's also easy to untie when the time comes.

To tie this version of this knot, I first placed the rope on a table and made two loops in the rope. Notice how I made these loops below. Notice how the rope overlaps itself. One over, one under. This is important.

two-loops.jpg

Next, I took the loop on the right, lifted it about half an inch, and moved it to the left so it sat on top of the left loop.

stacked-loops.jpg

And finally, holding both loops in place, I slid them over my demo log.

clove-hitch.jpg

This is the final Clove Hitch. When I pulled the ends of the rope to tighten the knot, I noticed that it really did want to roll out. To counter this, I tied a Bowline on the tails. Check this out.

clove-hitch-bowline.jpg

Now that's one heavy duty knot. The best part is, the way the Bowline is tied, equal pressure is placed on both tails of the Clove Hitch. Nice.
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #54

Clove Hitch, Tied with a Working End​


This is the same exact knot as above, but just tied differently. Sometimes in life, we don't have the end of a pole or a log to slip a bight of rope over. In these types of cases, it's helpful to know how to tie the knot using just the working end of the rope. That's what I've done below.

To tie this knot, I first began by feeding the working end of the rope over and then under the log.

rope-over-log.jpg

After that, I brought the end of the rope up and over the standing part.

working-end-over-standing-part.jpg

Next, I wrapped the rope around the log on more time, keeping the crossover intact.

second-wrap-around-log.jpg

At this point, I have two options. I can either feed the working end of the rope straight under itself like so, for a traditional Clove Hitch.

traditional-clove-hitch.jpg

Or, I can make a drawloop and feed that through. Either way, I'll get a Clove Hitch.

clove-hitch-draw-loop.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #55

Ground Line Hitch​


This is a great hitch to tie a smaller rope to a larger one. I used to use this knot when tying a thin throwball line to a thicker climbing rope when I used to climb trees. I was an arborist and this hitch came in handy just about daily. The best part was, the hitch stayed tight and was fairly smooth, meaning, there were no bulky knots to get caught up when, for instance, pulling the climbing rope through a crotch of a tree. Keep this one tucked in the back of your head.

To tie this hitch, I first placed the thick white cotton rope down on the table. Then, I placed some black paracord over the top of the rope.

working-end.jpg

Next, I wrapped the black rope around the white rope, going under and then over. I made sure to cross the black rope over itself.

wrap-around.jpg

After that, I fed the working end of the black rope under the white rope again.

over-under.jpg

To tie the actual hitch, I pulled the standing part of the black rope up to form a bight and then I fed the working end through it.

working-end-through-bight.jpg

And finally, to tighten this knot, I pulled the standing part of the black rope to trap the working end down. I also dressed the knot.

ground-line-hitch.jpg

If there was a super important load on one of the ropes, I'd tie the black rope off with an Overhand or another type of stopper knot.
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #56

Highwayman's Hitch​


I'm not sure if this hitch can carry any weight, but it's sort of fun to tie. After I tied it, I gave a tug on the standing part of the rope and it held securely, but I wouldn't want to trust it for anything that mattered. Perhaps I'm wrong. If I am, please correct me. Anyway, this hitch is a bight in a bight in a bight. I'll show you what I mean below.

To tie this knot, I first formed a bight with the working end of the rope and placed that bight under the log.

first-bight.jpg

After that, I took the standing part of the rope and made another bight. I fed that second bight through the first for a few inches.

standing-part-bight.jpg

Finally, I made a third bight, but this time with the working end of the rope. I fed that final bight through the second bight. Please note that I had to adjust the length of the working end of rope for this step. I kept it short for the first two steps so you could see the end of the rope in the photos. Adjust your rope length as necessary.

working-end-bight.jpg

To tighten this hitch, I pulled on the standing part of the rope and the working end bight and things snugged down nicely.

Here's the final hitch.

highwaymans-hitch.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #57

Rolling Hitch​


If you remember the Clove Hitch, you'll do very well with the Rolling Hitch. This hitch is just one more turn around the post. They say this hitch is meant to handle a pull from the side, so when setting this one up, make sure that the two turns around the post are facing the direction in which you'd like to pull the standing part of the rope.

To start off, I made a turn around the log and then crossed the working end over the standing part and made another turn, coming out of the bottom.

two-turns-around-post.jpg

I then crossed over the standing part again.

over-post.jpg

And continued feeding the working end of the rope under the log one more time.

second-turn.jpg

To finish up, I fed the working end under the last turn. I then pulled the ends of the rope to tighten the hitch.

rolling-hitch.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #58

Ossel Hitch​


What a great hitch. It's simple to look at and to tie, but it sure holds tight. When you need to tie a rope to a post or the like that keeps moving, this hitch is a good choice to use. It's stood the test of time and has passed with flying colors. Originating in Scotland, it's been popularized by its under water use.

To tie this knot, I first fed the working end of the smaller rope under and then over the larger rope.

first-bend.jpg

Then, I continued to feed the working end behind itself and over the larger rope again.

working-under-standing.jpg

Once over the top, I brought the working end under the larger rope once more.

working-under-rope.jpg

And finally, I fed the working end of the smaller rope through the first bend. To tighten this hitch, I pulled both ends apart from one another.

working-through-bend.jpg

ossel-hitch.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #59

Gaff Topsail Halyard Bend​


I'm not sure why they call this knot a bend, when it's clearly a hitch. I guess that's not important. What is important is how to tie this knot and how strong it is. I'll tell you right off the bat, if you're tying to a pole or an object that turns or rolls, don't use this hitch. If your pole is stationary, feel free to use this one. Personally, I wouldn't use it when you need a hitch that absolutely won't roll out. From what I have experienced, there's the threat of that, even when pulling the standing part at a 90° angle. To make this hitch much stronger and more secure, you may tie the working end off with an Overhand Knot. Just to be sure.

To tie this hitch, I made two bends around my log. I began from underneath and came up and around.

two-bends.jpg

Then, I fed the working end of the rope under the standing part and through the two bends.

under-standing-part-through-bends.jpg

I pulled the standing part to tighten it and I was finished.

gaff-topsail-halyard-bend.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
181
Points
16
  • #60

Vibration-Proof Hitch​


They say this hitch will resist vibration from the standing part. Not only that, but it'll actually get tighter, the more vibration there is. At first, I thought this one was difficult to tie, but after looking at it for a while and watching a video, I see that it's not difficult at all. As long as the instructional photos are followed, I think you'll get it. If you have any questions, please let me know.

To tie this knot, I made a bend around the log with the rope once, starting on top.

first-bend.jpg

I continued around the log and came out the bottom.

cross-under.jpg

This is where it initially seemed tricky, but it really wasn't. I fed the working end around and through the second bend. Remember, I went outside the bend and fed the working end around and then back in.

through-second-bend.jpg

And finally, I continued to feed the working end over the standing part and then under the bend again. To finish the knot, I pulled the standing part until it was snug.

vibration-proof-hitch.jpg
 
How to Tie Basic Knots was posted on 12-28-2020 by CraigHardy in the Outdoor Forum forum.
Similar threads

Similar threads

Search

Top