How to Tie Basic Knots

CraigHardy

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  • #61

Snuggle Hitch​


At first, I hated this knot. The book I'm using made far too many bends around the post. It was confusing and completely useless. After watching a video on YouTube, I figured out a much more simple method that holds nice and tight. I'm sure the first method would have held tight too, if I could have figured it out. Oh well. This version is awesome though, so give it a shot. The best part about this hitch is that it keeps tucking the working end underneath existing bends, clamping down on the rope overall. I gave the standing part a good pull when I was finished with it and it worked very well.

To tie this knot, I made a bend around the log, starting from top to bottom.

first-bend.jpg

I continued to bend around the log, going from top to bottom again.

overlap-second-bend.jpg

Next, I fed the working end of the rope under the second bend.

working-end-under-second-bend.jpg

I continued to bend the rope around the log, going from top to bottom once more.

third-bend.jpg

Finally, I lifted the original bend from the log to give space to feed the working end through.

loose-snuggle-hitch.jpg

After pulling the standing part to tighten the rope, I had a completed Snuggle Hitch.

snuggle-hitch.jpg

Obviously, I took this last photo from another effort at tying this knot. It's a good one though.
 

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  • #62

Boom Hitch​


This is a fairly bulky knot that's easy to tie. Essentially, the rope wraps around the post and overlaps itself a few times to create friction. It works well and stays in place. I don't think this one will pull out, due to all the bends.

To tie this hitch, I made a bend around the post from top to bottom.

first-bend.jpg

I crossed the working end over the standing part and made another bend.

second-bend.jpg

I crossed the working end over the standing part again and made another bend, but this time, inside the original bend. Follow the rope closely.

third-bend.jpg

Again, I crossed over the standing part and made another bend, this time, outside the second bend.

fourth-bend.jpg

And finally, I brought the working end up and tucked it under the second bend.

loose-boom-hitch.jpg

This is the final Boom Hitch.

boom-hitch.jpg
 

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  • #63

Timber/Killick Hitch​


This hitch goes by two names. The timber part comes from the logging industry and the killick part comes from the naval industry. They're one and the same and both hitches hold or pull long objects. This is actually a great little hitch that's fun to tie. At first, it appeared daunting, but as I began tying, it became apparent that this one is actually very simple. The best part is, it holds tight and can be easily trusted.

To tie this knot, I made a bend around the log with the working end of the rope, from bottom to top.

first-bend.jpg

I crossed underneath the standing part of the rope and continued around it and then through the bend.

through-bend.jpg

After that, I made another wrap around the rope with the working end. I pulled the standing part to tighten what I had already done.

double-wrap.jpg

To finish up, I took the standing part of the rope and brought it down the log a bit. Then, I made a bend around it.

second-bend.jpg

Finally, I took that end of the rope and fed it up and around the bend and pulled tight. This is the completed Timber/Killick Hitch.

timber-killick-hitch.jpg
 

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  • #64

Clinging Clara​


Here we've got another great hitch that holds tight. It's perfect when you'd like to attach a thinner rope to a thicker rope. I tied this and pulled as hard as I could to separate the two ropes to no avail. It's easy to tie too, which is always nice.

To start off, I placed the thicker rope down on the table. Then, I gave it two wraps with the thinner (orange) rope.

two-wraps.jpg

After that, I brought the working end of the orange rope over and around the standing part.

over-standing-part.jpg

Next, I brought the working end over itself and fed it through the second bend.

through-second-bend.jpg

I pulled both ends of the rope and dressed the hitch and I had the final knot.

clinging-clara.jpg
 

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  • #65

Lighterman's Hitch​


Boat operators use this hitch with their mooring lines to dock their boats. Barges even use it to pull other boats (berthing). Tremendous pressure is put on the knot. Because of all the tension involved, whichever hitch these types of people use, it's important that it untie easily. And because the Lighterman's Hitch never actually ties all the way, it comes undone remarkably well. It also holds like a charm. What an interesting knot.


Let's pretend that my piece of wood is a post on a pier. I'll be tying my mooring line to it.

To tie this knot, I first made two bends around the post.

two-bends.jpg

After adjusting for more slack on the working end, I partially pulled that end through to make another bend. This time, in the rope itself.

crossover-loop.jpg

Next, I flipped that bend right over top of the post.

completed-loop.jpg

And finally, after adjusting for more slack on the working end, I brought the end around the standing part and around the post once again. When finished, I simply let the working end drape over the standing part.

lightermans-hitch.jpg

Obviously, I had to keep adjusting the rope as I took these photos. If I began with a very long working end, I wouldn't have been able to show which end of the rope was which. In real life, I would have started out with a lot more rope.
 

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  • #66

Pile Hitch​


A very handy hitch indeed. This knot is extremely versatile and easy to tie. And as you'll see, almost impossible to come loose. I would think this hitch would be useful when tying a boat to a dock or any other circumstance where you've got a post with a top you can reach.

To tie this knot, I made a bend in my rope and fed it around the log, from top to bottom.

bend-around-post.jpg

I made sure the bend was fed under the standing end.

bend-over-top.jpg

To finish the hitch, I simply flipped the bend around the top of the post, or in this case, log.

pile-hitch.jpg
 

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  • #67

Knute Hitch​


This hitch has been around forever. If you're a camping enthusiast, you'll love this knot. If you have items that you'd like to hang, then this is for you. Basically, if you have an item with a small hole in it, you can tie a stopper knot at the end of your lanyard or paracord and you can use the Knute Hitch to hang the item or do whatever you wish with it. You'll see what I'm talking about down below.

For this example, I used a frying pan that has a hole at the end of the handle. I also used some black paracord I had laying around. I first tied a stopper knot in the paracord. Any stopper knot would do, but I used a two-stranded overhand knot with a loop. I wanted it to be as bulky as possible. To start off with, I made a bight in the working end of the rope and then pushed that bight through the hole in the handle.

bend-through-hole.jpg

Then, I fed the working end of the paracord through the bight.

working-end-through-bend.jpg

And that's it. The Knute Hitch. To tighten, I simply pulled the standing end of the rope.

knute-hitch.jpg

As long as the stopper knot is larger than the hole, this is a great hitch.
 

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  • #68

Double Pile Hitch​


This is the same exact knot as the Pile Hitch above, but with another wrap around the post. I won't spend any more time on this than necessary. I'll simply leave the photos below.

First, I gave the post two wraps with the doubled up rope.

double-wrap.jpg

Then I flipped the bight in the rope over the top of the post and pulled the standing parts to tighten the hitch.

double-pile-hitch.jpg
 

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  • #69

Bale Sling Hitch​


This is a great little hitch that's extremely easy to tie. It's perfect if you've got some sort of a loop strap or a short rope that you've tied like the one I've tied in the photo below. You can secure a sleeping bag, sack, or just about any other object that's able to be secured with this hitch.

To tie this knot, I first placed the rope down and then placed the object on top of it.

bight-in-rope.jpg

Then, I fed one end of the rope (bight) through the other. And that's it.

blae-sling-hitch.jpg

Ignore the Square Knot in the above photo. I merely tied the rope to make it endless.
 

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  • #70

Ring Hitch​


Here's another super easy, yet secure, hitch to try out. You can tie this one with either a loop rope or a regular one. It's perfect for lanyards on knives, canteens, etc... Pretty much anything that you'd like to attach a rope to, as long as there's a hole in your object.

To make this hitch, I fed the bight in the rope through the carabiner, from top to bottom.

bight-through-ring.jpg

Then, I took the working end and flipped it over so it sat on top of the standing part.

flip-bight-over.jpg

And finally, I pulled the top of the carabiner and the standing end of the rope in opposite directions to tighten the hitch.

ring-hitch.jpg
 

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  • #71

Icicle Hitch​


This is a great hitch to use when you've got to attach a rope to something smooth. If you're concerned about your rope sliding or slipping on your post, this is the hitch to use. The book says you can tie this hitch to a fireman's pole and it won't slip. And that you can pull a tree that's had the bark torn off it. It's that good. We all know barkless trees are slippery.

To tie this hitch, I first made four turns around my post.

four-turns.jpg

Then, after adjusting the rope to add more length to the working end, I took that working end and brought it up the backside of the log and then draped it over the front.

loop-drape.jpg

Doing this created a bight in the rope. You can see that in the above photo. It's the one that looks like a smiley face.

After adjusting the rope to add more length again, I took that bight and fed it over the right end of the log.

bend-loop.jpg

Here is the final Icicle Hitch.

loop-over-post.jpg

It looks a bit of a mess, but it's a great knot. If I were to pull on the standing end of the rope, the knot would snug down on the log and it would set tight.
 

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  • #72

Cat's Paw​


This is a handy hitch that adds some friction to a regular Ring Hitch. While the Ring Hitch is turned over once, the Cat's Paw is turned over three times. If one of the lines breaks for some reason, this hitch has a lot better chance of staying attached to the load because of the additional turns.

To tie this hitch, I first made a bight in my rope.

bight-in-rope.jpg

Then, I folded the bight over on top of itself.

first-turn.jpg

Next, I took each loop that was created and turned them backwards towards me two additional times.

second-turn.jpg

third-turn.jpg

After that. I gave each bight another half turn and attached them to the carabiner.

attach-to-carabiner.jpg

I pulled the standing parts of the rope to tighten the hitch and I had a finished Cat's Paw.

cats-paw-hitch-carabiner.jpg

cats-paw.jpg
 

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  • #73

Anchor Bend (Fisherman's Bend)​


This is my all-time favorite bend, or knot, or hitch - whatever you want to call it. I use this for climbing trees regularly, although, the version I use is slightly different. I'll get into that in another post. For now, I'll show you exactly how the book does it.

Fisherman used this hitch back in the day (and probably still do) for docking their boats when their ropes got wet and slippery. This bend locks down tightly and is very secure. If you really want to secure it so the rope has no chance in coming out, simply tie a safety knot (Overhand, Figure Eight) in the working end.

To tie this knot, I first made a bend and fed the working end through the carabiner from top to bottom.

bend-over-carabiner.jpg

Then, I repeated the process for a total of two round turns.

second-bend.jpg

Next, I fed the working end through both round turns.

working-end-through-bends.jpg

I pulled both ends of the rope to tighten the knot and to give the working end some slack. Then, I tied a Half Hitch.

second-half-hitch.jpg

And finally, I dressed the knot for a wonderful looking Anchor Bend.

anchor-bend.jpg
 

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  • #74

Anchor Bend Variant with Safety Knot​


I don't trust knots from sliding out, so I like to tie safety knots on working ends if possible. Also, the more wraps I can make a post, carabiner, or whatever, the better. For climbing trees and attaching my climbing rope to my carabiner, I like to use the Anchor Bend. It's a favorite knot of mine. Sorry, but just because someone on the internet says a knot is secure and won't slip, it doesn't mean I'll trust it. I use my brain when climbing and when I'm hanging from a rope I just tied.

For this Anchor Bend variant, I added a few safety features. If you look at the knot directly above, you'll see the traditional Anchor Bend that's finished with a Half Hitch. That final Half Hitch doesn't do much for me. Because there's no weight on it, it can come loose easily. Below, I'll show you how I compensate for this.

To tie this knot, I first tie the exact same Anchor Bend as above, except for the Half Hitch at the end. Instead of the Half Hitch, I feed the working end through the round turns an additional time.

double-anchor-bend-knot.jpg

anchor-bend-variant-double.jpg

As it stands, this is a very secure hitch, but not secure enough for me. When tying this knot, I like to leave long enough of a tail so I can tie an Overhand Knot on it.

anchor-bend-safety-knot.jpg

The working end is on the left. I could have tied a Figure Eight Knot as well, but this is fine. I'm very comfortable climbing with this knot to connect my rope to my carabiner. This one is common among arborists.
 

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  • #75

Halter Hitch​


This was a fun hitch to tie. It looks very complicated, but it's really not. Broken down, it's a cinch.

They say this is a good general purpose hitch. I tend to agree. I tied this one and gave the standing part a good pull and it felt secure. I'm not sure how easy it would be to untie this knot, but seeing that there are a few bends that can be unfolded to loosen the rope, I don't think there would be too much difficulty.

To tie this knot, I first made a bend around the post (or rolling pin).

bend-around-post.jpg

I fed the working end of the rope over the standing part. Then, I fed the working end under both sides of the bend.

working-end-under-bend.jpg

Next, I took the working end and made a bight in it. I fed that bight partially through the loop that was created a step earlier.

bight-in-working-end.jpg

Then I took the remaining working end and fed it up and over the rope and through the bight.

working-end-through-bight.jpg

To finish and dress the hitch, I pulled on the standing end until everything was tight.

halter-hitch.jpg
 

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  • #76

Half Blood Knot​


What a great way to attach a rope to a post, carabiner, hook, or just about anything else. This is a secure hitch that's been traditionally used by anglers to connect their fishing lines to their hooks. Easy to tie and very strong.

To tie this knot, I first brought my rope through my carabiner and made a bend in the rope.

bend-in-rope.jpg

After pulling the rope through about 12 inches more, I began twisting the working end around the standing part. I gave the rope about six twists.

rope-twists.jpg

I then brought the working end back to the carabiner and fed it through the loop.

working-end-through-loop.jpg

And finally, I held the twists in one hand and pulled the standing end with the other. The twists compressed into coils and those coils tightened on the working end and held it in place.

half-blood-knot-carabiner-rope.jpg

half-blood-knot.jpg
 

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  • #77

Mooring Hitch​


This is a knot that's commonly used to tie a boat to a dock. The reason folks like to use this one is because it's easily adjustable and simple to untie. To untie it, all one needs to do is pull the working end and the entire thing will unravel. After tying this knot, I gave it a good pull and it seemed plenty secure.

To tie this knot, I first made a bend with the rope under and then over the log.

bend-over-log.jpg

Next, I made a loop with the working end, over the standing end.

working-end-loop.jpg

Pulling the working end for more slack, I then made a bight in the working end.

working-end-bight.jpg

I fed the bight into the loop, under the standing part and then back out of the loop.

mooring-hitch.jpg

To finish, I pulled the standing part tight and then dressed the knot.

mooring-hitch-knot.jpg
 

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  • #78

Palomar Knot​


When researching this knot, I found that it's almost exclusively used to tie a fishing line to a hook, so I guess that's what it's used for. I actually like this knot. It's very easy to tie and is very strong. And I don't think it'll ever come out if you don't want it to.

To tie this knot, I first made a bight in the rope and fed it through the carabiner.

bight-in-rope.jpg

Then, I tied a simple Overhand Knot.

overhand-knot-with-loop.jpg

After that, I took the carabiner and fed it through the loop in the rope.

loop-over-object.jpg

I continued doing that until the loop had passed over the entire carabiner and the knot itself. Then, I dressed the knot and tightened it.

palomar-knot.jpg
 

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  • #79

Jansik Special​


This is a very strong attachment knot. It's great for use when you'd like to connect your rope to a ring, carabiner, or something like that. With its multiple turns around both the ring and itself, it's proven to be extremely durable and efficient.

To tie this knot, I first made a turn through the carabiner and passed the working end of the rope under the standing part.

first-turn-through-carabiner.jpg

I then repeated the previous step.

second-turn.jpg

Next, I took the working end and fed it through the loop I created with the two bends.

first-turn.jpg

I repeated the previous step twice more, making sure that each bend was passed over itself.

third-turn.jpg

Finally, I carefully pulled both the standing part as well as the working end to tighten down the knot. When I was finished, I had a wonderful Jansik Special.

jansik-special-knot-carabiner.jpg

jansik-special.jpg
 

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  • #80

Turle Knot (Turtle Knot)​


This is a simple knot used for things like pictured below. When you would like to tie a rope to a pot handle, this would be good. A fish hook - good as well. The reason this knot is so effective is because of the added friction applied to the first bend around the handle with the second knot. It works well and is easy to tie.

To tie this knot, I first fed the working end of my rope through the hole in the handle of the pan.

rope-through-eye.jpg

Then I passed the rope around the handle.

bend-around-handle.jpg

After that, I tied what appears to be an Overhand Knot. The first one of two.

first-overhand.jpg

Next, I tied another Overhand Knot. This time, it was with the tail of the working end.

second-overhand.jpg

After pulling both ends of the rope to tighten the knot, I had a wonderful looking Turle Knot.

turle-knot.jpg
 
How to Tie Basic Knots was posted on 12-28-2020 by CraigHardy in the Outdoor Forum forum.
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