How to Tie Basic Knots

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Bag Knot

This is a great little knot that's easy to tie. It's surprisingly secure too. All it takes is a few turns around the neck of your bag, a tuck, and you'll be all set. This knot can be tied with a draw loop or not. Both are good options. By using the draw loop though, you'll be making things a lot easier for you when it comes time to untie your knot. It's up to you though.

For this example, please pretend that my log is a bag. I didn't have one of those pretty canvas bags we see in the pictures, so I used the log instead. It's just as good though.

To tie this knot, I first made a bend around the log.

bend-around-log.jpg

Then I made another bend, making sure I crossed the working end over the standing part.

second-bend-around-log.jpg

After that, I took the working end and crossed it over the first cross.

working-end-cross-over-bends.jpg

And finally, I made a bight in the working end of the rope and tucked it under the very first bend. I pulled both ends of the rope to tighten.

bag-knot.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Sack/Miller's Knot

This is another handy knot you can use to tie closed a sack or a bag. It's effective, stays tight, and is easy to tie. There's no draw loop, so if it gets too tight, you may have a job on your hands getting it untied.

To tie this knot, I used a log as opposed to a sack again. I first placed the working end on a point of the log and then wrapped the rest of the rope around the log, making sure to cover the working end with the rope.

standing-part-over-working-end.jpg

Next, I fed the end of the rope I just wrapped around the log over itself and then under the first wrap. And that's it! Pull to tighten and you've got yourself a Sack or a Miller's knot.

sack-millers-knot.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Constrictor Knot

This is an awesome knot for tying the ends of frayed ropes. It's perfect for holding things in place and it's very secure. This is an ancient knot that has been used for all sorts of things. It can be tied in a few different variations to assist with loosening it or it can be tied the way I'll show you below to be used in semi-permanent situations.

To tie this knot, I first wrapped my rope around the log once, making sure to cross the working end over the standing part.

crossed-rope-over-object.jpg

I continued wrapping the working end around the log until it came out underneath.

second-wrap.jpg

I then created some space underneath the intersection of the wraps and fed the working end up and over the standing part and then under the intersection.

working-end-under-intersection.jpg

And finally, I pulled both ends to tighten the Constrictor knot.

constrictor-knot.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Transom Knot

This is a great knot to use when building a fort in the woods. If you're trying to tie together branches for walls and a roof, some twine along with this knot will do the trick. For my example, I used my heavy cotton rope in a cross formation, but sticks, pipes, or poles would probably be more suitable. Not to mention realistic.

To start this knot off, I fed the working end of the orange rope over the horizontal stick, under the vertical stick, and then back over the horizontal stick.

working-end-over-under-around.jpg

Then, I fed the working end over the standing part and under the vertical stick.

working-end-over-standing-part.jpg

And finally, I brought the working end back over the working part and under and through the intersection of the ropes.

working-end-around-under-standing-part.jpg

To tighten, I pulled both ends of the orange rope.

transom-knot.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Double Constrictor Knot

As if the single Constrictor knot wasn't enough, we've now got a double. This is one legit knot. I don't think this one will come undone if tied correctly. They say this knot is more suitable when binding larger and oddly shaped objects. I would have to agree. I like it.

To tie this knot, I first made a wrap around my object, which, in this case, is my doubled up white cotton rope. I wrapped with the orange rope.

single-wrap.jpg

I continued to wrap with the orange rope, making sure to cross the working end over the standing part.

continue-wrapping.jpg

I continue on, making another wrap with the orange rope, following the path I already made. I wrapped over the object and then under it.

double-wrap-over.jpg

double-wrap-under.jpg

At this point, I loosened both wraps a bit; just enough to allow the working end to slide under them. Then, I fed the working end of the orange rope under the wraps.

working-end-under-both-wraps.jpg

At this point, the knot is very good. But it can be better. To make it so, I pulled on the standing part to give me some space to work.

standing-part-slack.jpg

Next, I took the working end and fed it around and through the loop I created in the standing part.

working-end-through-standing-part-loop.jpg

And to finish the knot, I pulled both ends of the orange rope tight.

double-constrictor-knot.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Spade End Knot

Some fishing hooks don't have eyes, meaning, there's no hole to feed your fishing line through. They have spades instead, meaning, the end of the hook is enlarged as to not allow the fishing line knot to slip over it. The only issue is that you need to know which knot to tie to the spade end hook. That's what I'm here for. I'll explain it down below.

Okay, let's pretend that the white cotton rope is the fish hook. The spade end is on the right and the hook itself on the left. The orange rope will be the fishing line and ultimately, the tension will be coming from the right. So that's the way I'll tie this knot.

To start off, I made a bight in my orange rope. The part I'll be wrapping around the hook will be longer than the other part.

bight-in-line.jpg

Next, I place the bight on top of the hook and begin making a wrap with the working (longer) end of the orange rope.

cross-over.jpg

I'll make five or six wraps.

multiple-wraps.jpg

When I'm finished with that, I'll take the shorter end of the rope and feed that through the loop.

working-end-through-loop.jpg

And finally, to tighten the knot down, I'll pull both ends of the rope with some good pressure. I can also trim the excess rope off the left side.

spade-end-knot.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Angler's Loop

This is an easy knot to tie and it's very secure. It's a fantastic loop knot that's got a long history. It's perfect for tying with all types of rope and won't come loose very easily at all.

To tie this knot, I first made a loop with my rope.

partial-overhand-knot.jpg

Then, I tied an Overhand knot, leaving a loop with the working end.

overhand-knot-with-loop.jpg

After that, I fed the working end of the rope under the standing part.

working-end-under-standing-part.jpg

Finally, I fed the working end of the rope through the core of the knot.

working-end-through-knot.jpg

To tighten this knot, I pulled the loop as well as the working end away from one another.

anglers-loop.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Figure-of-Eight Loop

This is a very secure loop that can be made even more secure by tying the working end to the standing part when finished. Some people don't like this knot because it's tough to untie with some ropes, but if you're using a modern climbing rope, that shouldn't be a problem.

To tie this knot, I first made a bight in my rope. Then, I folded the bight over the standing part.

loop-over-standing-part.jpg

I continued to bring the bight around the standing part.

loop-around-standing-part.jpg

And then I brought the bight up and I fed it through the loop that was just created. To tighten, I pulled both ends of the rope.

figure-of-eight-loop.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Bowline Loop

The Bowline is a great loop knot. It holds firmly and is used very commonly in the trades. At first, it's a bit confusing to tie, but once you begin using it on a regular basis, it becomes second nature.

To tie this knot, I first made a loop with my rope, saving enough of the working end to make the final loop. In my case, that was about 12 inches.

first-bend.jpg

Next, I took the working end and fed it through the loop.

working-end-through-loop.jpg

And then I fed the working end under the standing part.

working-end-under-standing-part.jpg

And finally, I took the working end and brought it around the standing part and through the loop again.

through-loop-again.jpg

I pulled both ends to tighten the knot down.

bowline.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Eskimo Bowline Loop

This knot also goes by the name Boas bowline. It's more secure than the traditional bowline, but in the beginning, it's slightly more challenging to tie. I had to redo my efforts a few times before I got it right. If you follow the photos below though, you should get it just fine. And much more quickly than I did.

To tie this knot, I first made a loop with my rope.

rope-loop-eskimo-bowline.jpg

Then, I made another loop.

second-loop-eskimo-bowline.jpg

I then fed the working end of the rope under both loops.

working-end-under-standing-part-eskimo-bowline.jpg

And to finish things off, I took the working end of the rope and fed it around the second loop and under the first loop, otherwise known as the standing part. Then, I took the working end and continued over both loops. The second loop is actually the loop of the knot. That's the one you'll pull to make larger.

working-end-around-under-standing-part-eskimo-bowline.jpg

To tighten the knot, I pulled on the second loop, the working end, and the standing part.

eskimo-bowline.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Double Bowline

This is the same exact knot as the single common Bowline, but with an added loop at the beginning. Because of the added loop, this is a stronger knot than its little brother. For not much more work, this is a more worthy knot.

To tie this knot, I first made two loops with my rope, leaving a 12 inch tail.

two-loops-double-bowline.jpg

Next, I took the tail (working end) and fed it through the loops I just made.

working-end-through-loops-double-bowline.jpg

Then I fed the working end under the standing part.

working-end-under-standing-part-double-bowline.jpg

And I continued to feed the working end around the standing part and back through the double loops.

around-standing-part-through-loops-double-bowline.jpg

To tighten the knot, I pulled on the working end, standing part and the newly formed loop.

double-bowline.jpg

double-bowline-loop.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Water Bowline

We're now splitting hairs with these Bowline knots. This next version is almost the same as the previous, with one small difference. It's in the two loops that are created at the beginning. In one knot, they're compressed together and in the other they're apart, separated by the rope. It really makes no difference though. These are both great knots that form wonderful loops. It's up to you to decide which you like better.

To tie this knot, I first created a loop with the working end of my rope.

first-loop-water-bowline.jpg

I then fed the working end through the loop.

working-end-through-loop-water-bowline.jpg

After that, I made another loop with the standing part.

second-loop-water-bowline.jpg

And I continued to feed the working end through the loop and under the standing part.

working-end-through-second-loop-water-bowline.jpg

working-end-under-standing-part-water-bowline.jpg

Finally, I fed the working end through both loops.

working-end-through-both-loops-water-bowline.jpg

To tighten this knot, it'll take some dressing. I pulled both ends of the rope, along with the loop as well. Then, I dressed the knot itself until it was tight.

water-bowline-loop.jpg

water-bowline.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Manharness Knot

This is an excellent knot for tying a bight in the middle of a run of rope. There are many occasions you may want to do something like this; when attaching multiple animals to a single line, when lowering a chainsaw from a tree, when holding posts in position; the list goes on. This is a sturdy knot that doesn't slip. It's also easy to tie.

To tie this knot, I first made a loop in my rope. For this knot, there is no working end and standing part.

first-loop-manharness-knot.jpg

Next, I took the left side of the rope and placed it under the loop.

side-under-loop-manharness-knot.jpg

I then brought that same part of rope that I just brought under the loop and continued bringing it above the right side of the loop.

side-over-loop-manharness-knot.jpg

After that, I took the right side of the loop and fed it through the opening at the center.

reverse-sides-manharness-knot.jpg

Finally, I pulled on the part I just brought through the center as well as both ends of the rope. That tightened the knot.

manharness-knot.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Alpine Butterfly Loop

This is one of my three favorite knots. First is the Anchor hitch, second is the Bowline, and third is the Alpine Butterfly loop. This is such a handy knot for a number of reasons. Climbers of all types use it for a variety of reasons. They can attach a carabiner to it and hang off it. It's great for rescue operations. If a climber is in a tree, this knot is handy when the ground-man needs to pass something to the climber. If a rope is partially cut and that part of the rope needs to be taken out of use and isolated, simply make it part of the loop area. This is a strong knot that's very popular out there in the rope world.

To tie this knot, I first made a bight somewhere in my rope and then gave it a double twist.

double-twist-alpine-butterfly-loop.jpg

Then, I took the loop that was formed at the top of the rope and folded it underneath the twists. This created two loops; a larger one and a smaller one.

fold-loop-over-alpine-butterfly-loop.jpg

I took the bottom part of the larger loop and passed it up and through the smaller loop.

feed-large-loop-through-small-alpine-butterfly-loop.jpg

To tighten this knot, I pulled on the loop as well as both ends of the rope.

alpine-butterfly-loop.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Three-Quarter Figure-of-Eight Loop

I have no idea who made this knot up, but I'm not a fan. It's complicated to tie and I'm not even sure how you would use this one to tie a loop in a long rope. I did it with my short piece and succeeded because I was able to use both ends. If I didn't have that second end, I'd be in trouble. But be that as it may, here it is, in all its glory.

To tie this knot, I first made a bight in my rope and placed it on the table. Then, I placed the standing part of the rope over the bight and draped the working end over the standing part.

loop-under-standing-part.jpg

After that, I fed the working end under and through the bight loop.

working-end-through-loop.jpg

Next, I took the working end and fed it around the working end and through that same loop. To see this, follow the loop that's all the way to the right. That's the end of the rope I'm referring to here.

standing-part-through-center.jpg

Finally, I pulled on the loop that's to the left and held the ends of the rope in place. That tightened the knot down.

three-quarter-figure-of-eight-loop.jpg
 

CraigHardy

Well-Known Member
Bowstring Knot

This is a handy little knot that has its uses. They say it's popular with tying and adjusting tent pole lines. It is adjustable, but you need to remember to tie a stopper knot if you are looking for security. With this knot, there's nothing holding the working end in place but friction, so it's important that you stop that end from pulling free under tension.

To tie this knot, I first made a loop at the working end of my rope.

first-loop-bowstring-knot.jpg

Then I continued to tie an Overhand knot.

overhand-knot-bowstring-knot.jpg

I made a gap between the working end side of the overhand knot and then fed the working end through that gap.

working-end-through-overhand-bowstring-knot.jpg

I'm including the next photo to show you which end of the rope you need to pull to make the ultimate loop. It can be confusing for first timers. The loop will be made with the working end portion of the rope. Take a look.

tightening-bowstring-knot.jpg

So really, the longer the working end, the larger the loop.

Finally, after pulling the working end loop enough to tighten the rest of the knot, I had a completed Bowstring knot.

bowstring-knot.jpg
 
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