Tree Climbing Termination Knots

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CraigHardy

CraigHardy

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  • #1
There are a lot of knots to learn when it comes to climbing trees. Many of them have to do with the climbing itself, some have to do with lowering branches, and some have to do with all the other odds and ends you find yourself doing when you're an arborist. Instead of discussing every single knot one might have to learn while working in the tree business, I've decided to focus this thread strictly on termination knots. This type of knot is my absolute favorite - I'm not even sure why. Perhaps it's because termination knots are generally easy to tie and are extremely secure. Whatever the case, there are a fair number of them and as time passes, I'll do my best at explaining each one (with pictures) on this page. If you've got any suggestions or knots you'd like to share, please don't hesitate adding to the discussion down below.
 
CraigHardy

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  • #2

Anchor Hitch​


This is my go-to termination knot for tying my climbing rope to my carabiner. Because it's a cinch knot, it doesn't run or come loose. The more weight that's put on the rope, the tighter the knot becomes. The only thing you need to make sure of is to have enough of a tail on this one. For cinch type termination knots, you need at least five rope widths of a tail. Personally, I just make a long tail and then tie a stopper knot in it (Overhand or Figure Eight). I always use stopper knots with my termination knots. The last think I want to do while up in a tree is worry about my knots.

To tie this knot, I placed my carabiner on the table as if it was attached to my harness and then I brought the climbing rope through the carabiner, from front to back. I brought the rope around the carabiner twice.

anchor-hitch-double-wrap.jpg

Next, I took the working end and fed it behind the standing part. Please note that I adjusted the length of the rope as I tied this knot. I had to keep the working end short for the sake of photography.

anchor-hitch-working-end-around-standing-part.jpg

After that, I brought the working end all the way around the standing part and fed it through both turns in the rope.

anchor-hitch-working-end-through-loops.jpg

And finally, I pulled both ends of the rope to tighten it. By the way, this is the stiffest rope I've ever worked with. It's not real tree climbing rope. It's cheap stuff from Amazon that's used for making tree swings.

anchor-hitch-termination-knot.jpg

anchor-hitch.jpg

PS - I want to mention one more thing in regards to tying this knot. If you'll notice, I began this knot by running the rope down the spine of the carabiner. This will keep the weight where the carabiner is strongest. It's important to remember small details like this when tying arborist termination knots.
 
CraigHardy

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  • #3

Double Fisherman's Knot​


The second knot I'd like to show you is called the Double Fisherman's knot. This is another favorite of mine. It may actually tie the Anchor hitch in its security and ease of tying. The Double Fisherman's is an excellent termination knot for use with a carabiner when climbing. There's no way this knot is coming out. And because of its security and ability to cinch down on whatever it's tied around, many tree and rock climbers use this knot when making homemade prusik loops. It's pretty much the go-to knot for making terminations of this type.

By the way, I had to go back to my soft orange rope for these demonstrations. The white rope was just too stiff. It wouldn't stay in position when I let go of it.

To tie this knot, I first placed my carabiner on the table as if I were wearing it on my climbing saddle. Then, I brought the working end of my rope down and through the carabiner, from back to front.

double-fishermans-knot-working-end-through-carabiner.jpg

After that, I made a bight in the rope and took one wrap around the standing part.

double-fishermans-knot-bight-wrap.jpg

Next, I made one full wrap around the standing part.

double-fishermans-knot-first-wrap.jpg

And then another wrap, for a total of two.

double-fishermans-knot-two-wraps.jpg

I brought the working end to the front of the knot and fed it through, underneath the wraps.

double-fishermans-knot-working-end-through-wraps.jpg

To tighten the knot, I pulled on both ends of the working end.

double-fishermans-knot.jpg

double-fishermans-knot-carabiner.jpg
 
CraigHardy

CraigHardy

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  • #4

Buntline Hitch​


The Buntline is another awesome termination knot that's used for climbing. It's a good one too because, unlike the Anchor hitch, this hitch only uses one piece of rope that's fed through the carabiner or clip. So if you've got a clip with a small hole in it, where two wraps around would be too much, try out the Buntline hitch. It's very easy to tie.

Also, the Buntline is really just a Clove hitch in disguise. I'll show you what I mean in the photos below.

To tie this knot, I first placed my carabiner on the table as if I had it attached to my climbing saddle. Then, I fed the working end of the rope through the carabiner, from back to front. I made a bight and began bringing the end of the rope around the back of the standing part.

buntline-hitch-bight.jpg

I continued bringing the standing part around the front of the rope.

buntline-hitch-first-wrap.jpg

And then I fed the working end around the back again.

buntline-hitch-working-end-around-back.jpg

This is the part that's most important. Do you see how I made an "x" in the rope above? Well, the working end needs to be fed under that x. Take a look below.

buntline-hitch-rope-under-cross.jpg

To finish up, I pulled the ends of the rope tight until the knot tightened. Look for the Clove hitch below.

buntline-hitch-loop.jpg

buntline-hitch.jpg

And then I cinched the loop down on the carabiner.

buntline-hitch-cinched-carabiner.jpg
 
Tree Climbing Termination Knots was posted on 05-28-2021 by CraigHardy in the Outdoor Forum forum.

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