Tree Identification

CampFireJack

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I'd like to use this thread to identify trees in my area and to get feedback on those identifications. Some trees I'm absolutely sure of, but there are others that are quite confusing. For instance, for the life of me, I can't tell the difference between red, white, and black spruce trees. But when it comes to rock (sugar), crimson, and red maples, I'm confident of my knowledge. To start off, I'd like to offer some good information on two different trees we have here in Maine. I'll post each below.
 

CampFireJack

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Identifying the Striped Maple​

This has got to be one of the strangest Maple trees I’ve ever seen. The first time I noticed we had one on the property was a few weeks ago. I was cutting down an Ash tree and saw an odd “weed” type plant growing next to it. I’d say the tree was about an inch and a half thick and only about ten feet tall. It sort of looks like on of those weird tree/bushes you see on the side of the road. Something that doesn’t grow very tall. If you look at the leaf picture below, you’ll notice that it’s kind of fleshy. That usually tips me off to a low growing plant.

Apparently I was wrong. What I found was, in fact, a tree and a Maple tree to boot. These types of Maples grow over 25 feet tall with a diameter of 8 inches. That’s a somewhat legit tree. It’s not the mighty Oak or anything, but it’s most definitely a tree.

striped-maple-identification-book.jpg

We walked around the woods quite a bit today and now that I’ve identified what we’re looking at, I’m beginning to see these things everywhere. It helps that we’ve got leaves finally growing, because I would most likely pass these guys by. They are very small.

Now that we’ve got the story out of the way, let’s take a look at some pictures. First, here is a nice shot of a Striped Maple leaf:

striped-maple-leaf.jpg

Now, take a look at a Striped Maple branch or stem:

striped-maple-stem.jpg

Do you have striped maples on your property? Are they limited to the northeast United States?
 

CampFireJack

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Identifying the Eastern Hophornbeam​

Have you ever heard of an Eastern Hophornbeam (or hop hornbeam)? No? Neither have I. I have now though because we’ve got one growing in the back woods.

I was walking around the woods yesterday, minding my own business when I happened to notice a tree that didn’t look like the typical Ash or Maple. I stopped, took a closer look and immediately thought it was a Hickory. It was the bark that made me think that. Then, I noticed the leaves. I said, “Nah, that can’t be a Hickory. The leaves are too small.” I was correct. It’s not a Hickory.

hop-hornbeam-identification-guide.jpg

Good thing my friends up the road let me borrow their Forest Trees of Maine book, because one of today’s goals was for my lady and me to head outside and identify the tree. Here’s what it looks like:

hornbeam-bark.jpg

hornbeam-leaves.jpg

As you can see, the bark does look like Shagbark Hickory bark. Of course, the Shagbark Hickory has much more coarse bark.

Since I have this book in my hands, I’m going to attempt to identify all the trees on our property. Some of them, such as the variety of Maples would be fun to really nail down with their formal names. Not the Latin ones, but the real ones, instead of saying, “Yeah, that’s a Maple.” Stay tuned.
 
Tree Identification was posted on 10-13-2021 by CampFireJack in the Outdoor Forum forum.
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